Cookbook: A Kitchen in France

November 22, 2014

A Kitchen in France cover

It is the season for big, beautiful cookbooks. Once such new entry into the holiday book gift arena is A Kitchen in France. Written by Mimi Thorisson (who is also the face and voice behind the equally lovely blog Manger), this book is beautifully photographed and gracefully designed and is devoted to Thorisson family as they live, eat and explore in the French countryside.

A Kitchen in France onion tart

When I first opened a copy of A Kitchen in France, I expected to find a lovely book that would give me the opportunity to escape into world different my own. What I didn’t expect was that the book would also contain a goodly number of recipes that I would want to immediately flag for my own to-make list.

A Kitchen in France butternut gratin

Now that the days are getting downright bone-chilling, I found myself most drawn to the soups, gratins, and stews. Anything to warm us up from the inside out appeals right now. So far, I have the Harvest Soup (page 158), Garlic Soup (page 242), and Beef Cheek Stew (page 261) on my to-make radar. Thank goodness Scott doesn’t ever get tired of eating soup for dinner!

A Kitchen in France back

I have cooked one thing from this book so far and it was a winner. When I was down in Austin last month, I made the Butternut Gratin on page 195. I took pictures of a few recipes that sounded good (so that I could try them while traveling without bringing an eight pound book with me). My sister had half of a giant squash in her fridge and some heavy cream in her fridge, so the pieces just fell into place.

A Kitchen in France spine

This recipe has actually gotten a lot of play on various websites recently, being that it’s the type that would work on a Thanksgiving table. And while that’s true, having now made it for a weeknight dinner (and pared it with turkey burgers and steamed broccoli), I think it’s one that shouldn’t be overlooked for humbler occasions.

butternut squash gratin

Most of the work is in prepping the squash, but if you have a sturdy peeler and a sharp knife, even that goes fairly quickly. I won’t reprint the recipe here, because it’s already so many places on the web (including Food52 and Leite’s Culinaria) When I made it, I used about 3/4 pound more squash than the recipe called for, and topped it with a mild grated cheddar and seasoned bread crumbs out of a cardboard canister.

Even with those humbler ingredients (used because that’s what was available), it was delicious. There were four adults and one pre-schooler eating dinner that night and we didn’t leave a drop leftover.

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3 thoughts on "Cookbook: A Kitchen in France"

  • What a beautiful looking book but the cover gives me a back ache just looking at it!! I was always shocked at how low Julia Child’s Paris stove was, but then again Julia Child was 6′ tall; Now I see the french kitchen is designed to burden all cooks by making their work surfaces so low everyone has to hunch over!! Is that what the secret is to such delicious food?!!

  • I bought this cookbook when I was in Paris recently and I’m absolutely head over heels in love with it.

    As soon as I got home I made the galette Pérougienne which is every bit as good as you’d think brioche dough topped with more butter and sugar and then baked in a really hot oven to caramelize the sugar would be.

    I’ve had my eye on the garlic soup as well, and the bouillabaisse. And pretty much everything else.