Canning 101: Why Pumpkin Butter Can’t Be Canned

pumpkins

This time of year, a canner’s fancy turns to pumpkins. Tis the season for all things round, orange and squashy, after all. However, as you start searching for recipes for home canned pumpkin butter from reputable sources, you’re going to find yourself disappointed. You see, both the USDA and the National Center for Home Food Preservation are going to tell you the same thing. Don’t do it.

I’m sure there are more than a few of you out there saying to yourself, “but I’ve been making and water bath canning pumpkin butter for years!” And it’s true, many years ago, there were USDA-approved recipes for pumpkin butter. Unfortunately, the rules of canning are not a static canon and so, in 1989 the USDA changed their recommendations and the NCHFP followed suit. No home canning for pumpkin butter, not even in a pressure canner.

The reasons why homemade pumpkin butter isn’t recommended are several. When cooked down into a butter, pumpkin flesh becomes quite dense, making it difficult for the heat produced in a canner to penetrate fully through the contents of the jar. This means that even in a pressure canner, the interior of the jar may not reach the 240 degrees needed to kill those pesky botulism spores.

Additionally, pumpkin and all other winter squash are a low-acid vegetables, meaning that without careful treatment, they could potentially be a friendly environment in which botulism spores might grow into their toxic adult state. In tests, it’s been found that the pH of pumpkin has a fairly wide range, meaning that it’s not possible to offer a basic acidification ratio as there is for other borderline and low acid foods.

The good news is that pumpkin butter can be frozen and also keeps quite well in the fridge, so it doesn’t have to be entirely off the menu. I’ve also been pondering whether one could make a an apple-pumpkin butter that would be high enough in acid to be safe for canning, but would contain enough pumpkin to be sufficiently autumnal. I may do a bit of playing around, to see if I can get somewhere close to the flavor I’d like to eat.

If you’re curious to read more about the safety hazards of canning pumpkin butter and other squash purees, click here to download the PDF that was the primary source for this post.

Related Posts:

, , ,

209 Responses to Canning 101: Why Pumpkin Butter Can’t Be Canned

  1. 101
    kristin says:

    I just wanted to say that I was going to can my pumpkin butter after reading several people on other sites say they’ve done it safely for years. But then I came across your site. I do NOT want to risk anyone’s lives – and especially those of my children – just to can pumpkin butter. I think I will just freeze it now! Thank you so much for your many comments addressing all of the concerns, so helpful. 🙂

  2. 102

    […] a pint of spread. Note that I split that into three jars, though. Squash doesn’t can safely (it’s too low in acid), so cold is its best preserver. I kept one jar in the fridge to enjoy over the next couple weeks, […]

  3. 103
    Hat says:

    Hi!
    I was looking for the official government info on pumpkin canning for a friend and came here knowing you would be the one to have the link to it. You do! But sadly, the link you offer (and everyone else too! ) is dead :-(.
    Has the opinion of our great and wonderful government changed on this topic?

    • 103.1
      Marisa says:

      Oh shoot. I’m sad to hear that that link is now dead. However, the government hasn’t changed its opinion on canning pumpkin.

  4. 104
    Sandy says:

    I’m not an experienced canner but I am curious that if you can’t can pumpkin butter then how is it that I was able to purchase it in a jar unrefrigerated at my local Sprouts grocery store? Is that not the same thing just done commercially?

    • 104.1
      Marisa says:

      Commercial canning facilities are able to achieve higher levels of heat and pressure than can be reached at home. That’s how they’re able to preserve those varieties of pumpkin butter that you see in the grocery store.

      • Sandy says:

        Thanks for the quick response! I apologize for my ignorance on the subject (trying to educate myself) but isn’t there some way to get to a higher temperature? What temperature does commercial canning reach? Your info is very helpful!

        • Marisa says:

          There is simply a limit on how much heat and pressure a pressure canner designed for home use can achieve (the top safe temperature is 250F and you don’t want to take a until beyond 18 pounds of pressure). You need more than that to reliably penetrate to the center of a dense puree like pumpkin butter and kill off any present botulism spores. Unfortunately, there’s just no way to safely can pumpkin butter at home.

  5. 105

    […] could go through all the reasons why not, but those have been covered exhaustively in the comments in Marisa’s post over on Food in Jars. It really made me laugh. Here’s my version. […]

  6. 106
    Brady McElligott says:

    We can pumpkin in half-pint jars, at fifteen pounds, for about ninety minutes. Since all spoilage, including botulism, creates gases, and none of our jars have broken the seals for several years, and none of us have sickened, we are figuring that we are safe.

    Just how many of us have ancestors that have canned pumpkin/squash, ans have sickened and/or died from canning-borne poisons?

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Swap-Box Hero: Roasted Pumpkin Butter | Boxing Day - October 14, 2015

    […] a pint of spread. Note that I split that into three jars, though. Squash doesn’t can safely (it’s too low in acid), so cold is its best preserver. I kept one jar in the fridge to enjoy over the next couple weeks, […]

  2. Crock-Pot Pumpkin Butter | Coffee to Compost - December 3, 2015

    […] could go through all the reasons why not, but those have been covered exhaustively in the comments in Marisa’s post over on Food in Jars. It really made me laugh. Here’s my version. […]

Leave a Reply