Marinated Dehydrated Tomatoes

Got a dehydrator and some tomatoes? Make these marinated dehydrated tomatoes! They are easy, delicious, and so satisfying come winter.

marinated dehydrated tomatoes in ziplock bag

The first summer I had a dehydrator, I dried everything I could get my hands on. I did peaches, apples, herbs, citrus, tons of fruit leather and buckets of small tomatoes. I kept my sturdy Nesco running for days at a time, and found that I missed its constant drone when it was finally unplugged and put away.

sliced tomatoes for marinated dehydrated tomatoes

Since that first heady season, I’ve narrowed down the things I regularly dehydrate. It is still one of my favorite methods of food preservation, I just have learned more about which dehydrated things that work best in my kitchen and have stopped doing the ones that I didn’t manage to use up as well.

herbs and spices for marinated dehydrated tomatoes

Top on my must-dry list each year are tomatoes. I do them a couple of different ways. I always do two or three dehydrator loads of small tomatoes like grape and sungold to use in salads throughout the year. And I always (ALWAYS) make some marinated and dried tomatoes.

marinade for marinated dehydrated tomatoes

I first learned this trick years back from Kristina McLean’s blog Mouth From the South. She is an avowed tomato lover and takes the growing and preserving of tomatoes very seriously. So the first time I made them, I knew they’d be good. I just didn’t realize quite how life-changing.

pouring dressing into marinated dehydrated tomatoes

If you have a dehydrator, these marinated dehydrated tomatoes are incredibly easy to make. You slice up about five or six pounds of tomatoes and heap them in a bowl. Then you puree together olive oil, balsamic vinegar, fresh parsley, rosemary, garlic, salt, red chili flakes, black pepper, and the juice and zest of a lemon.

marinated dehydrated tomatoes

Once the marinade is smooth, you pour it over the tomatoes. Using your hands, gently give it all a good stir and then let it sit. Because I rarely have enough space in my fridge, I only marinate for a couple of hours. You could also cover the bowl and tuck it in the refrigerator overnight if you’ve got more cold storage than I do.

marinated tomatoes on trays for marinated dehydrated tomatoes

Then you arrange the marinated tomatoes on your dehydrator trays, stack them up, and set it to 135 degrees F. I typically slice my tomatoes so that they’re a little more than 1/2 inch thick and they take about 18 hours like that. If you cut yours thicker, give them more time.

These days, I’m using the new Excalibur stackable dehydrator that I wrote about here. I particularly love the fact that it comes with the mesh screens that make it easier to remove the finished tomatoes (because they stick like crazy).

finished marinated dehydrated tomatoes

When the tomatoes are dry and chewy, they’re done. Then it’s just a matter of pulling them off the trays, heaping them in zip top bags, and stash those bags in the fridge or freezer (thanks to the oil, they really need the cold storage).

I often eat a few while thinking about what to make for dinner. They’re nice as a garnish on a bowl of soup or a grain salad. And for fancy times, I like to chop them and fold them into softened butter for tasty bread.

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freshTECH HarvestPro Sauce Maker Giveaway

Need a little help getting your tomatoes preserved this season? Check out the freshTECH HarvestPro Sauce Maker from Ball Canning!

freshTECH HarvestPro Sauce Maker

We are in the midst of tomato season here in the Philly area and I’ve been in something of a canning frenzy trying to get as many put up as I can before I hit the road again. I find that there is a huge flavor difference between home canned tomatoes and grocery store ones, and so I know that I’m going to be said come January if I don’t take action now.

I used to do most of my tomatoes whole and peeled, packed in water. However, these days I find that I like to do a fifty-fifty split of whole tomatoes and tomato puree. I started doing a lot more tomato puree a few years ago, in large part because an electric tomato press came into my life.

There are a few different brands of these handy machines on the market, and this year, our friends at Ball Canning added one called the HarvestPro to their freshTECH line of appliances.

running the freshTECH HarvestPro Sauce Maker

Having used a number of different tools for pressing tomatoes into sauce, this HarvestPro Sauce Maker is by far the easiest to set up, run, and clean up when you’re all done. It doesn’t splatter like my previous electric press, and the motor base plants itself solidly on your countertop. I’m a huge fan and will be making permanent space for this in my kitchen (or, more realistically, in my coat closet).

Right now, all the freshTECH appliances are 15% off on the Fresh Preserving website (I’m also a really big fan of the Electric Water Bath Canner). If you want to see it in action, I’ll be streaming on Facebook Live tomorrow night (Tuesday, August 23) at 9 pm eastern time for about a half hour to show you how it works.

I also have one of these handy machines to give away this week. Use the widget below for your chance to enter!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Disclosure: Ball Canning sent me the HarvestPro you see pictured here for review purposes and they are providing the giveaway unit. What’s more, I am also a paid brand partner. However, this post is outside our paid agreement. I just really liked this particular machine and so asked if I could share it with my readers. All thoughts and opinions expressed are my own.

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Upcoming Events: Fayetteville, Atlanta, and Nashville!

Naturally Sweet Food in Jars cover (1)

Attention southern canners! I am headed your way this weekend! If you’re in (or near) Fayetteville (AR), Atlanta, or Nashville, please mark your calendars, sign up for classes, and come out to say hi!

Saturday, August 27 (Fayetteville, AR)
I’ll be offering a canning and preserving demo at the Fayetteville Roots Festival. I’ll be at the Festival Plaza at 2 pm and will have books for sale and signature.

Saturday, September 3 (Decatur and Atlanta, GA)
11:15 – 12 noon, you’ll find me at demonstrating at the Decatur Book Festival. After the demo is over, I’ll be signing books! Then, from 3 to 4:30, I’ll be at Atlanta Botanical Garden, teaching a demo-style class. Registration info here. So much fun in a single day!

Sunday, September 4 (Chattahoochee Hills, GA)
I’ll be at the Bosch Experience Center in Serenbe for a five course Prepared Pantry Dinner. Every course of the meal is based on a recipe from Naturally Sweet. Thanks go to Lyn Deardorff from Preserving Now for making this event happen! 4-7 pm. $75 (which includes a copy of my new book). Get your tickets here.

Tuesday, September 6 (Nashville, TN)
I’ll be teaching a demo-style class at Green Door Gourmet. The class is from 5-7 pm and is $35. We’ll have copies of my books on hand for sale and signature. Register here.

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Links: Wild Jams, Homemade Crackers, and a Winner

tomato jam and naturally sweet

I spent the weekend in New York and Western Mass, finding a really good balance between working and relaxing (it’s not always easy to do). I taught at Amber Waves Farm in Amagansett (we’re already talking about doing another class next season) on Friday afternoon, spent Saturday morning demoing at the Great Barrington Farmers Market, and taught again at Hillsdale Home Chef on Sunday afternoon.

Saturday afternoon and evening was spent hanging out with some dear friends. It was so good and was exactly what I needed to shake loose from the tension that’s been haunting me.

peach drizzle in orchard road jars

Thank you for all the enthusiastic entries into last week’s Orchard Road giveaway. I loved hearing about the things you’ve all been preserving lately. The winner of the giveaway is #500/Manda. Stay tuned, I’ll have another giveaway up shortly.

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Peach Habanero Hot Sauce

This peach habanero hot sauce brings sweet, gentle heat to all your favorite foods. Make sure to use peaches at the pinnacle of ripeness for maximum deliciousness.

finished peach habanero hot sauce

I am not someone who goes for crazy hot foods. I firmly believe that eating should be grounded in pleasure rather than pain or discomfort. However, I do believe that there’s something uniquely appealing about sauces that allow for the careful, targeted application of gentle heat.

And so, when I develop hot sauce recipes, they are relatively mellow, mild ones that enhance rather than sear. Dealer’s choice, as it were.

quick peeling peaches for peach habanero hot sauce

That’s all to say that this may well be the most tame peach habanero hot sauce you’ll ever encounter. If you’re someone who likes to be challenged by your condiments, this probably isn’t the recipe for you. However, if you like sweet, easygoing heat, you are in the right place.

peppers for peach habanero hot sauce

For this recipe, I used the peeling technique described in this post (quarter peaches, lay them in a heatproof baking dish, bring kettle to a boil, pour over peaches, rinse with cold water, peel). Once peeled, they went into a big pot with diced onion, a sweet orange pepper, six seeded habaneros (wear disposable gloves!), garlic, vinegar, a little sugar, lemon juice, and salt.

ingredients for peach habanero hot sauce

I simmered everything over medium heat while making dinner, giving it a stir on occasion and breaking up the peaches with my spatula with every turn. Once the peaches were totally tender and the onions were translucent, I used an immersion blender to puree the sauce smooth.

peach habanero hot sauce in pot

I canned the sauce in some of the barbecue sauce bottles I got from Fillmore Container, though you could just as easily use 12 ounce jelly jars. I look forward to opening one up in a couple months, when it’s had time to mellow even more.

Oh, and in case you missed my post yesterday, this hot sauce was made with peaches from the folks at the Washington State Fruit Commission. I made this Gingery Peach Butter with the other half of the peaches. Nectarine recipes are still to come.

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Tomato Classes with Weaver’s Way and Greensgrow

Three trays of tomatoes for canning

This post is for my Philly-area readers! I’ve been posted and tweeting about my upcoming events in large, round-up posts, but I wanted to take a minute to pull out two upcoming tomato-centric classes and make sure that you all don’t miss them.

On Wednesday, August 24, I’ll be out in Chestnut Hill with my friends from Weaver’s Way for a class focused on safely making and preserving homemade salsa. This class is from 7-9 pm and costs $30. You can register here.

Then, on Saturday, September 10, I’ll be up in Fishtown with the folks from Greensgrow for another tomato-focused class. In this one, we’ll make tomato jam. This one is from 12-2 pm and costs $35. The registration form is here.

In both of these classes, we’ll dig into the nuts and bolts of safe tomato preservation. We’ll talk about acidification, proper use of the boiling water bath, and I’ll talk you through how to preserve tomatoes in other styles. You’ll also go home with small jars of the preserves we make in class, along with a useful packet of tomato canning information.

I hope to see some of you at these classes!

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