Low Sugar Pear Cranberry Jam

Low Sugar Pear Cranberry Jam - Food in Jars

Last week, a day or two before I left for Portland, I made three batches of jam in rapid succession. The first was a combination of pears and persimmons. The second was a gingery apple butter. And the last one was a low sugar pear cranberry jam.

I meant to share the apple butter last week, and then got lost in travel and the pleasure of being with my parents and thus getting to be slightly less responsible than normal, so it didn’t happen. Because Thanksgiving is looming and I’ve been procrastinating, I thought I’d get this one up first, so that if it appealed to you, there’d still be time to make it before the holiday.

Making Pear Cranberry Jam - Food in Jars

And while we’re on the subject of Thanksgiving and cranberries, don’t forget that the archives of this site are bursting with seasonally appropriate recipes. Here are some of my favorites.

Low Sugar Pear Cranberry Jam

Yield: Makes 3 pints

Ingredients

  • 3 pounds pears, cored and chopped
  • 1 pound cranberries, rinsed well
  • 2 cups granulated sugar
  • 1 lemon, zested and juiced
  • 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/2 teaspoon grated nutmeg
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves

Instructions

  1. Prepare a boiling water bath canner and enough jars to hold three pints.
  2. In a large pot, combine the pears, cranberries, sugar, lemon zest and juice, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, and cloves. Stir well, until the sugar has started to dissolve.
  3. Set the pot on the stove over high heat and bring to a boil.
  4. Once the mixture has started bubble vigorously, reduce the heat to medium-high and cook, stirring regularly, until the pears soften and the cranberries have all popped. If the jam seems a little too tight and the cranberries haven't all popped, add a splash of water to loosen it up.
  5. When the pears are tender, the cranberries have popped, and the jam seems nicely thick, it is done (budget 20-25 minutes of active cooking time).
  6. Remove the pot from the heat and funnel the finished jam into the prepared jars. Wipe the rims, apply the lids and rings, and process in a boiling water bath canner for 10 minutes.
  7. When the time is up, remove the jars from the canner and set them on a folded kitchen towel to cool.
  8. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry. Any unsealed jars should be refrigerated and used promptly.
http://foodinjars.com/2015/11/low-sugar-pear-cranberry-jam/

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14 Responses to Low Sugar Pear Cranberry Jam

  1. 1
    Lisa G. says:

    Low sugar jams always appeal to me! Is it a simple matter to adapt a recipe like this to freezer jam instead?

  2. 2
    jess says:

    I’m making your persimmon chutney this weekend, thanks to a neighbor’s tree. It’s a hit with my family every year, as are the pickled cranberries.

    California’s quince crop didn’t do well this year thanks to the drought, so I haven’t been able to get my hot little hands on any this this season.

    Any recipes involving pomegranates? Another neighbor has a pomegranate stand each fall, selling organic fruit from her trees for 50 cents to $1 on the honor system. Mostly I just eat the arils as they are, or toss them on salads, but I keep wondering if there is some way to involve them in canning.

  3. 3

    So persimmons CAN be canned? I couldnt find any legit-looking recipes, and they look to be less acidic than the usual suspects … please point me to some trusted recipes!! I had a lead on a loaded Fuyu-variety tree, but only grabbed what I could eat out of hand 🙁

  4. 4
    Jo M says:

    This was awesome. Cranberry jams are the best and easiest because they always set up so well!

  5. 5

    I just discovered this morning that I am down to my last jar of homemade jam, and since strawberries aren’t in season for me to make my go-to standby, I might have to give this a try instead. Love the color! It looks delicious.

  6. 6
    Katie says:

    Love it such a great idea and perfect for holiday season!!¨xoxo Katie http://www.whatskatieupto.com

  7. 7
    Brooke says:

    Can you half this recipe? If so, can you half all of your jam recipes?

    • 7.1
      Marisa says:

      You can always cut a recipe in half. The time it’s an issue is when the recipe calls for liquid pectin, because it can be sort of challenging to divide a packet of liquid pectin in half.

  8. 8
    Natalie says:

    Could I make this in larger batches? Say triple or quadruple?

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