Small Batch Blood Orange Marmalade

blood oranges

When I first started making marmalade, I thought it was the same as any other preserve. Chop the fruit, combine it with sugar and cook until set. I didn’t realize that citrus needed a more specialized treatment. You either need to cut away the tough, white pith or treat it in some way so that it tenderizes and loses its chewy bitterness.

blood orange marm cut one

This recipe uses an overnight soak to help break down the pith, providing a far superior product to the old blood orange marmalade recipe you’ll find on this site. The fruit becomes tender and it fully suspended in a ruby-hued jelly. Here’s how you do it.

Take 1 pound of blood oranges (approximately 4-5 tennis ball-sized oranges) and wash them well. Trim away both ends and slice the oranges in half.

blood orange marm cut two

Using a very sharp knife, trim away the core of the oranges and pluck out any seeds that you find. Set the cores and the seeds aside. Not all blood oranges have seeds, so don’t stress if you don’t find any.

blood orange marm cut three

Cut the orange halves into thin slices. Go as thin as you can manage (I recommend sharping your knife before starting this project).

blood orange marm cut four

Finally, cut each sliced half in half again, so that you have a number of thin blood orange quarters.

seeds and membranes

Bundle up all those seeds and pithy cores in a length of cheesecloth and tie it tightly so that nothing can escape.

soaking blood oranges

Put chopped oranges in a medium bowl and cover with 3 cups water. Tuck the cheesecloth bundle into the bowl and cover the whole thing with a length of plastic wrap or a plate. Refrigerate it overnight.

blood orange marm cooking

When you’re ready to cook your marmalade, remove the cheesecloth bundle. Combine the soaked fruit and water with 2 1/2 cups granulated sugar. If you happen to have a copper preserving pan like the one you see pictured above, make sure to fully dissolve the sugar into the fruit before pouring it into the pan.

three half pints

Bring the marmalade to a simmer and cook until it is reduced by more than half, reads 220 degrees F on a thermometer and passes the plate/sauce/wrinkle test. When it is finished cooking, pour marmalade into prepared jars. Wipe rims, apply lids and rings and process in a boiling water bath canner for 10 minutes.

blood orange marm

When all is done, you should have three half pints of the most vivid red blood orange marmalade. I’m extraordinarily fond of this particular preserve on peanut butter toast, as you can see above. It’s also good on scones, stirred into yogurt or with crumbly homemade shortbread.

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158 Responses to Small Batch Blood Orange Marmalade

  1. 101

    […] once cool), or by slicing the fruit into small pieces and then soaking for a period of time (this is a good example of that approach). In either case, you can choose whether you cut the rind into chunks, bits or slivers (this […]

  2. 102

    […] Blood Orange Marmalade […]

  3. 103
    Heidi says:

    Marisa- I just made this marmalade yesterday as a participant in the Canning Mastery Challenge. Just tried it today as you suggested on peanut butter toast. Delish!!!!!!

  4. 104
    Cathy Kempf says:

    Marisa, didn’t see this addressed anywhere: why would you remove the cheesecloth bag during cooking if it contains beneficial pectin?

  5. 105

    […] used this recipe from (roll for surprise) Food in Jars for blood orange marmalade. I actually cut up the […]

  6. 106
    LisaMary says:

    Instead of adding the piths and seeds in cheesecloth, I used a handful or so of citrus rinds leftover from the making of some simple syrups. Worked like a charm, and easy pick up the halved rinds just before the pot going on. After this they can still go into making citrus “cleaning vinegar” or popped in the steam pot with herb ends for when it gets too dry in the house.

  7. 107
    Rosemary says:

    Prepared ready to cook -should I add juice of a lemon to provide pectin?

  8. 108
    Sue Story says:

    I always cook the peel before adding the sugar and after the overnight soaking as the peel won’t really soften once the sugar is added. I do mine in the pressure cooker for 20 minutes

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. How to Make Marmalade for the Food in Jars Mastery Challenge - Food in Jars - January 3, 2017

    […] once cool), or by slicing the fruit into small pieces and then soaking for a period of time (this is a good example of that approach). In either case, you can choose whether you cut the rind into chunks, bits or slivers (this […]

  2. Homemade Jellies! – Momma Dweeb - January 10, 2017

    […] Blood Orange Marmalade […]

  3. Food in Jars Mastery Challenge: January – Tesla Anomaly - January 30, 2017

    […] used this recipe from (roll for surprise) Food in Jars for blood orange marmalade. I actually cut up the […]

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