Small Batch Blood Orange Marmalade

blood oranges

When I first started making marmalade, I thought it was the same as any other preserve. Chop the fruit, combine it with sugar and cook until set. I didn’t realize that citrus needed a more specialized treatment. You either need to cut away the tough, white pith or treat it in some way so that it tenderizes and loses its chewy bitterness.

blood orange marm cut one

This recipe uses an overnight soak to help break down the pith, providing a far superior product to the old blood orange marmalade recipe you’ll find on this site. The fruit becomes tender and it fully suspended in a ruby-hued jelly. Here’s how you do it.

Take 1 pound of blood oranges (approximately 4-5 tennis ball-sized oranges) and wash them well. Trim away both ends and slice the oranges in half.

blood orange marm cut two

Using a very sharp knife, trim away the core of the oranges and pluck out any seeds that you find. Set the cores and the seeds aside. Not all blood oranges have seeds, so don’t stress if you don’t find any.

blood orange marm cut three

Cut the orange halves into thin slices. Go as thin as you can manage (I recommend sharping your knife before starting this project).

blood orange marm cut four

Finally, cut each sliced half in half again, so that you have a number of thin blood orange quarters.

seeds and membranes

Bundle up all those seeds and pithy cores in a length of cheesecloth and tie it tightly so that nothing can escape.

soaking blood oranges

Put chopped oranges in a medium bowl and cover with 3 cups water. Tuck the cheesecloth bundle into the bowl and cover the whole thing with a length of plastic wrap or a plate. Refrigerate it overnight.

blood orange marm cooking

When you’re ready to cook your marmalade, remove the cheesecloth bundle. Combine the soaked fruit and water with 2 1/2 cups granulated sugar. If you happen to have a copper preserving pan like the one you see pictured above, make sure to fully dissolve the sugar into the fruit before pouring it into the pan.

three half pints

Bring the marmalade to a simmer and cook until it is reduced by more than half, reads 220 degrees F on a thermometer and passes the plate/sauce/wrinkle test. When it is finished cooking, pour marmalade into prepared jars. Wipe rims, apply lids and rings and process in a boiling water bath canner for 10 minutes.

blood orange marm

When all is done, you should have three half pints of the most vivid red blood orange marmalade. I’m extraordinarily fond of this particular preserve on peanut butter toast, as you can see above. It’s also good on scones, stirred into yogurt or with crumbly homemade shortbread.

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135 Responses to Small Batch Blood Orange Marmalade

  1. 51
    Landi Cranstoun says:

    Just made a double batch of this, and wound up with about 5 half pint jars (I think I would have gotten more out had I not been eating it as I went)! Absolutely lovely and just the right balance of sweet and bitter. Now on to the grape catchup recipe (planning on using it for pulled pork next week)…

  2. 52
    mjSVCA says:

    Since I gave all my canning supplies away years ago, I am wondering if this marmalade could be frozen–instead of processed in a water bath…? I’m hoping you’ll say, “Just fine.”
    Thanks

    • 52.1
      Marisa says:

      You could freeze it, or you could just let the jars seal and keep them in the fridge. They’ll keep 6-8 months unopened in the fridge.

  3. 53
    Denny says:

    I made my first ever batch of Mandarin orange marmalade a few months ago. I opened a jar and it’s . . . Um . . . Firm. I bent a spoon trying to get it out of the jar. Do you suppose it’s salvageable? I’m guessing that I cooked it way too long, not recognizing it was “passing” the plate test. I tested a second jar, just to see if it wasn’t a problem with that one jar, but it was tough, too. If it’s salvageable, should I heat the jar of marmalade in hot water with the lid off and then refrigerate it and use soon? Or what? Thanks so much!

    • 53.1
      Astrayelmgod says:

      First, the recipe says there are three tests, and the batch has to pass all three tests. This is not correct; pick one test and ignore the others.

      Second, the recipe doesn’t say that the 220 degrees figure applies only at sea level. You have to reduce the temperature at altitude. The USDA has a jam making guide that includes a chart for the correction.

      Third, when my first batch reached 220 degrees (I live very near sea level), it had reduced by only about one third (and yes, I was measuring with a ruler). If you use the plate test, remove the pot from the heat while the sample cools, things happen very fast at the end. If you use temperature, remove the pot from the heat the exact second it reaches your temperature, don’t let it cook further at all. One degree makes a lot of difference in the end result. The USDA says that marmalade can be cooked again if it doesn’t set up enough; I have not had that problem, and so can’t comment.

      Fourth, this has nothing to do with setting, but I think the rind should be thinner than shown in the pictures. Commercial marmalade rind is so thin it is nearly translucent. For one batch, use a very sharp knife. I bought a mandolin, which speeds the job up a lot, but I haven’t really gotten the hang of using it yet so it is only somewhat thinner. Also, the mandolin leaves a lot of rind that still has to be cut by hand.

      • Jules Burton says:

        Astrayelmgod, (took me a sec to work out the handle — nice!) thanks for saving me the time to not just type the equivalent of what you said above, but also the thinking. SO grateful, because like you, I try to assist when needed, but time is oh so short for me right now.

        While there’s lots of room to play in the jam, jelly, preserve, and conserves (I routinely cut the sugar in half and usually don’t have to use the low sugar pectin — have no idea why, since the variety of fruit doesn’t seem to make that much difference. I got lucky with my first canning attempt, where I cut the sugar from the start, and have just been on a roll since. My problem seems to lie with using liquid pectin, but that’s another story.

        Denny, I highly recommend buying a mandolin. It makes slicing *so* easy and *so* fast, and every slice is exactly the same size. It is a *severe* cutting hazard, so ALWAYS employ the hand guard (in extremis, you can use the *flat* of your hand as many chefs do, but I’d try to avoid it until you’re an expert). There are mandolins out there that cost a blooming fortune, but we bought the Oxo brand which was the second least expensive one at the time. We can slice down to 1/16″, and make a variety of shapes with different blades, including julienne.

        I also agree with Astrayelmgod that the peel should be MUCH thinner. There’s so much pith in the jars above that even with soaking and alkaline processing, I can’t believe those jars are anything but a bitter yuck. (Sorry, FIJ, you know I love ya, but…)

        It’s very difficult to remove *all* the pith, but you just don’t want that white bitter mealiness in your marmalade. Trust me. My first attempt at canning was a five citrus marmalade where I was *very* careful about pith. It turned out wonderfully, but it took hours and hours. I decided to make some sugar-free for my diabetic in-laws, but wanted to shortcut the process and juiced my grapefruit using a juicer.

        I can’t tell you how bad an idea that was. It spit all the pith out with the juice, not the peel. The color wound up looking more like lemon curd — not at all translucent. That was bad enough, but it was nothing but one of the nastiest things I’ve ever eaten, and I’m game to try anything, so have eaten some weird stuff.

        Since I had already done jars for ourselves, I didn’t taste this batch — my second cardinal sin in that effort. I had a reputation for creating great food that required pretty decent technique, and my first gift to them was completely inedible. (Of course, they were too nice to say anything, but we ran out and I had a jar of the other still here and opened it and KNEW how nice my in-laws were. :D

        Good luck fixing the batch!

  4. 54

    […] she mentions another blog called Food In Jars. When I visited this site, I found the recipe for Blood Orange Marmalade. Yum. Just the thought of a nice piece of sourdough spread with a little homemade marmalade, washed […]

  5. 55
    Liz Butcher says:

    Any ideas why this would turn GREEN when cooking? Could it bee that the fruit was sprayed with pesticides the sunk into the skins? They were lovely like yours when I began….

    Thanks…

    • 55.1
      Joseph says:

      Notes from a chemist: IF you used a copper preserving bowl, the copper may have reacted with the acids in the fruit to form a copper-based salt. For example, copper acetate (formed when copper reacts with vinegar) is a dark blueish colour while copper citrate (formed when it reacts with citric acid) is an intense, light blue. I suspect it is the later. Copper citrate occurs naturally both in nature and in foods and is actually used, when large amounts are present, as a pesticide. Small amounts are harmless, but if the marmalade is really dark, I would dispose of it to prevent risk of diarrhea and stomach upset.

  6. 56
    Hitelia says:

    Any ideas for making mango marmalade?

  7. 57

    […] Blood Orange Marmalade from Food in Jars (love this one) […]

  8. 58

    […] crispy duck with an orange sauce and sweet potato rolls.  Then, of course, duck fat potatoes.  Marmalade.  I have an idea for some s’mores brownies kicking around in my head that I want to attempt.  […]

  9. 59
    kp says:

    Any thoughts on making a jalapeno orange marmalade?

    • 59.1
      Marie says:

      The Ball Complete Book of Home Preserving includes a recipe for Orange Chili Marmalade (or maybe it was jam, but either way, you could adapt). :)

    • 59.2
      bunny says:

      KP- i’ve been thinking about chile but not necessarily jalapeno. Tonight I will try it with blood oranges as that combination is a Mexican classic.

      Does anyone know why you are to put the pith and seeds into the oranges to soak overnight?I had no seeds and very little pith.

  10. 60

    […] Orange Marmalade adapted from Food in Jars’ Blood Orange Marmalade 1 pound oranges (I used 3 large and weighed them) 3 cups water 2 1/2 granulated sugar (I used super […]

  11. 61

    […] the time for citrus fruits and citrus fruits make marmalade!!! Anyone have any secret recipes? Small Batch Blood Orange Marmalade – Food in Jars | Food in Jars Strawberry Lemon Marmalade 1 qt frozen strawberries, in sugar 4 medium lemons, chopped 3 c. […]

  12. 62
    Charlotte says:

    I spent quite some time today cutting up 2 kilos of bloodoranges. They are now in the fridge.
    I took your advice about a sharp knife to heart so I sharpened my chef’s knife and then proceeded to cut my left index finger. It was my first time in 5 years that I hurt myself in the kitchen. And to have it happen while cleaning bloodoranges made me chuckle.

    Tomorrow I sterilize some jars and cook my marmalade. Can’t wait!

  13. 63
    Rose says:

    I bought 10 blood oranges today and they weigh 4 pounds. Can I use this recipe? How much water and sugar should I use?

    • 63.1
      Marisa says:

      Rose, you could multiply this recipe and make a larger batch. Just increase everything in proportion. I would recommend that you separate it into two batches.

  14. 64

    […] shrub instead of some wine. Instant blood orange chicken (follow that sauce up with a dollop of blood orange marmalade to emphasize the […]

  15. 65
    macincolorado says:

    Hi- My fiancee and I just tried our first batch of blood orange marmalade yesterday (recipe from the big Ball cookbook). Wish I’d seen this one, seems much easier than me spending hours separating the membranes! However, due to being slightly gel-shy since our last batch of clementine marmalade was rock hard from overcooking, we erred too much on the side of caution this time and ended up with 12 small (4oz) jars of ….. blood orange syrup! We are making 100 jars of jams/jellies/marmalades as wedding favors and would like to reprocess this batch. I’ve heard of how to do it for jams and jellies, but is it the same process for marmalade? It seems trickier than our other, simpler jam recipes. I don’t want to add extra pectin, just cook a bit longer if possible. Thoughts?

    • 65.1
      Marisa says:

      You can use the same technique outlined in this post for your marmalade. If you don’t want to add additional pectin (though because blood oranges are a hybrid fruit, they don’t have many seeds, which means you don’t have the same opportunities for pectin extraction than you do with seedier citrus), you can just bring it back up to a boil. Cook to 221 or 222 degrees F to ensure your set.

      • macincolorado says:

        Thanks for the tips! We recanned last night and … let’s just say that the threshold between “syrup” and “hard candy” is a mighty small one! It is now rock hard, and it happened so FAST! It still tastes good, and we’ll be happy to heat and eat as crepe toppings, etc. but won’t be giving this batch away. Oh, well, this IS the Mile High City, so we’ll just chalk it up to “altitude” :-) and try again with fresh fruit. This time we’ll use your recipe – the best part of all this may end up being that it led me to your site!

    • 65.2
      Jules Burton says:

      I wish we’d thought of making food gifties for wedding guests. Clever.

  16. 66

    This is just the recipe I was looking for.
    Do you know why soaking the slices with the pith and seeds work? Just curious.

  17. 67
    Debra says:

    My 1st go at marmalade making (I love blood orange marmalade – most marmalades are too bitter for me). This was scrumptious. I simmered for quite a while but it wasn’t really reducing, so I ramped up the heat and boiled at 220, it didnt pass the cold plate test, so boiled it for a further 5, then 5 more mins, and a few more. It still seemed runny but I decided that was enough and luckily its just right!
    To the previous post – I’ve read a while back that pips have natural pectin in. My blood oranges had a few so maybe that helped not being so runny in the end.
    Thanks for the recipe- it’s a keeper :)

  18. 68

    […] lemons. There’s a recipe in my cookbook, but if you don’t have it, use this recipe for Small Batch Blood Orange Marmalade. It will work just as well. If you want something a little different, consider trying the […]

  19. 69
    Melanie says:

    I am in the throes of making your blood orange marmalade recipe in your book, but I am thinking that it is a little too sweet for me. How much can I cut back on the sugar so that it is still safe to can? I will try the above recipe next!

    • 69.1
      Marisa says:

      Read this post. Sugar doesn’t play a role in safety, it helps with set and shelf life.

      • Melanie says:

        Thanks! Obviously, I jumped right into the recipe, and didn’t read all the supporting information. Marmalade update: it is not too sugary, I jumped the gun. Also, it is the most beautiful color I have ever seen! A true winner, love it.

  20. 70
    Sahar says:

    Hi! I have recently started making jam and you and your blog have been so helpful. I followed your instruction to make small-batch strawberry jam and it turned out beautifully. I just made some blood orange marmalade (my first attempt was an over-cooked disaster!), I have canned it and I’m hoping it sets alright but the zest has all accumulated at the top of the jars. Is that a bad sign?

    • 70.1
      Marisa says:

      It sounds like after your first overcooking experience, you undercooked the second batch. The zest accumulating at the top simply means that the jelly isn’t thick enough to keep it fully distributed.

  21. 71

    […] Enter Marissa from Food in Jars.  I love her blog (and her cookbook).  She has this amazing recipe for small batch blood orange marmalade.  Her method is a simple, two-day process.  Cut the fruit […]

  22. 72

    […] Small Batch Blood Orange Marmalade from Food In Jars […]

  23. 73
    John Ridgway says:

    In order to sterilise the jars, merely fill them with boiling water and wait a couple of minutes. It is difficult to judge the set of blood orange marmalade. I find that about 35 minutes of furious boiling does the trick and the mixture reduces approximately by half and thickens. I use cling film as a seal before screwing on the jam jar top. Although I usually add a couple of lemons to the mixture, I have successfully used a bergamot for some added pectin.

  24. 74

    […] from Small Batch Blood Orange Marmalade by Marisa McClellan, Food in […]

  25. 75

    […] own the Food in Jars cookbook but want to make Meyer lemon marmalade, Marisa says you can follow this recipe, just swap in Meyer lemons for the blood oranges. Strawberry Meyer Lemon Marmalade is another great […]

  26. 76

    […] Loaf and it called for home-made marmalade so I thought it would be the perfect chance to try out this recipe I found. The recipe was perfect as it makes a small quantity of marmalade and not jars and […]

  27. 77

    […] But if you really, really need to see photos of the recipe in process, you can check Marisa’s blog post. My marmalade looks almost exactly like hers, but is a bit less chunky since I cut my orange pieces […]

  28. 78

    […] actually like those. I decided to try it anyway when Marissa at Food In Jars posted a recipe for Small Batch Blood Orange Marmalade right where I could salivate over the […]

  29. 79
  30. 80

    […] eggs with marmalade—I made my own, it’s blood orange marmalade from Food In Jars—I’ve also made the equally delicious triple citrus marmalade.  Eat slowly […]

  31. 81
    Heather says:

    Hi there. I found your website after hearing you on the canning season podcast. Thanks for that.

    My question is: my blood orange tree isn’t making oranges yet. But I have a dwarf calamondin orange tree ready to go. Can I simply substitute a pound of these for a pound of those in order to make the marmalade recipe? They can both be bitter and tart as far as oranges go, so my thinking is they could be treated the same… What do you think?

    • 81.1
      Marisa says:

      I’ve never tried calamondin oranges, so I can’t really speak to whether they can substitute in. However, if they are similar to oranges in flavor and structure, it should be okay.

  32. 82
    Christina says:

    Will be making this today – found that a mandolin worked amazing to slice the oranges. Must do the z slicing motion to not crush the oranges.

  33. 83
    Gill D. says:

    That was SO easy and delicious! Love not cutting all that pith off. Thank you. I love that it surprised us with a sweet tartness like a grapefruit and beautiful. I was staring at the lovely gift of 10 blood oranges in wonder but, after mamalading three batches in a week, was tired of trimming rinds.

  34. 84
    Jenn says:

    just made this with meyer lemons for my first canning adventure! so amazing and also so easy! i am so happy about how it turned out, and excited for my future forays into canning!

    i had 2 extra meyer lemons so then i made your meyer lemon curd too! sooo delicious!

  35. 85
    Ashni says:

    Would a nut milk bag work instead of cheese cloth?

    • 85.1
      Marisa says:

      If your nut milk bag is made of a synthetic material, it might melt in the preserve. In that case, I wouldn’t do it.

  36. 86

    Hi Marissa,

    I tried an experiment this week based on this recipe for Blood Orange Marmalade and the Meyer Lemon marmalade in your book. I live in San Jose, and all my citrus trees are popping just now. Last week, I made the ML and it turned out great. I had a lot of Blood oranges too, and didn’t want to make a small batch of jam. I used the same method as Meyer Lemon, same ratio of fruit to sugar. It worked great, and was a lot less work than boiling everything separately. I also have a copper preserving pan, so I wanted to combine the sugar and water with the fruit in the same big container.

    Thanks for the great recipes.
    Mona

  37. 87
    Courtney says:

    I made a batch of this over the weekend and it was absolutely wonderful. I will definitely be making more this weekend. I had intended to give them away at my local food swap, but now i think i need to save a few for myself.

  38. 88

    […] summer hello autumn weather. So I thought I’d spend the day in the kitchen armed with the blood orange marmalade recipe from Marissa at Food in Jars and just started […]

  39. 89
    Melissa F says:

    Oh my. I just finished two double batches of this recipe, subbing the BOs for meyer lemons. In the first batch I added some lavender, in the second, I added rosemary. Both are absolutely divine.

    This is my first time attempting marmalade, and the set is perfect! I’ve always loved marmalade, but I must admit that these two batches are the best marmalade I’ve ever tasted :)

    Thank you so very much, Marisa, for continuously sharing such wonderful recipes and helping us noobs feel comfortable by sharing your extensive knowledge!!!!!!!

  40. 90

    […] McClellan, who writes the Food in Jars canning blog, has a really simple methodology for blood orange marmalade that seemed pretty easy. Basically you but your citrus up the night before you want to make the […]

  41. 91

    […] So much fruit there was no way her adorable family of three could use it all, so I asked if I could take some. It’s late in the season so the fruit is heavy with juice, not so great for slicing, but perfect for incorporating. I found this recipe for small batch Blood Orange Marmalade online from the great site Food in Jars. […]

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