Quart Jar Cabbage and Carrot Kraut

Three ingredient cabbage and carrot kraut is an easy and delicious ferment for beginners and seasoned picklers alike. Try it with scrambled eggs!

finished cabbage and carrot kraut

I learned to make sauerkraut nearly a decade ago on a episode of Fork You (an online cooking show that my husband and I used to make. The website still lives, but after a long-ago hack, there’s not much there). Since then, it’s rare that I don’t have a jar in the fridge or bubbling away on the countertop (often, I have both).

shredded cabbage and carrots for kraut

Back in my early kraut making days, I made lots of different kinds. I’d use spices. I’d add fresh herbs. But there was always one variety I came back to. Cabbage and carrot kraut.

massaged cabbage and carrots for kraut

A couple of years ago, I gave up on the fancy krauts and accepted the fact that this is my house version. It’s the one that I like best and happily eat with eggs, tucked into sandwiches, and with turkey kielbasa.

top of cabbage and carrot kraut

I make one quart jar at a time, because I don’t want to devote my whole fridge to the endeavor. I combine three parts shredded cabbage with one part grated carrot, add a bit of salt, massage it until it releases a bunch of liquid, and pack it into a jar.

cabbage and carrot kraut in a jar

Weigh it down with one of these glass pickle pebbles from Masontops, set the jar on a saucer and cover it with a small kitchen cloth, held in place with a rubber band. Then I wait about a week, until it’s tangy and bright. Into the fridge the jar goes, ready to be eaten.

top of finished cabbage and carrot kraut

Occasionally, I do make a plain batch or one threaded with fennel fronds, but this particular version forever has my heart.

Carrot and Cabbage Kraut

Yield: makes 1 quart

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 pounds shredded cabbage
  • 8 ounces grated carrot
  • 1 tablespoon sea salt

Instructions

  1. Combine the cabbage, carrots, and salt in a large bowl and rub them together until you have a goodly amount of liquid in the bowl.
  2. Pack the cabbage and carrots into a wide mouth jar a handful at a time (press each layer down firmly. If you push it all in at once, you won't get it all into the jar).
  3. Once you have all the veg into the jar, weigh it down with a pickling weight or a four-ounce jelly jar filled with water.
  4. Set the jar on a saucer. Cover it with a little kitchen cloth or a paper towel, and secure it with a rubber band, and place it somewhere on your kitchen counter that's out of direct sunlight.
  5. Check the kraut every couple of days and push it back down as it expands.
  6. When it tastes tangy and good, it's done! Put a lid on the jar and transfer it to the refrigerator.
http://foodinjars.com/2016/11/cabbage-and-carrot-kraut/

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24 Responses to Quart Jar Cabbage and Carrot Kraut

  1. 1
    Gene Black says:

    Cabbage and Carrot is the favorite at my house also.

  2. 2
    Sue D says:

    Looks good–I will give this a try.

  3. 3
    Rose says:

    Step 4… “set the jar down on a sauce.” What does that mean?? Thanks! Looks easy enough to try!

    • 3.1
      Patricia R. says:

      I’m sure she meant “saucer” in case it drips.

      • Marisa says:

        I did mean saucer. Thanks for catching the error!

        • Marne Rogers says:

          I bought a large jar of commercial pickles for it’s tall shape and wide mouth and saved it specifically for kraut making. It accommodates a small to medium head of cabbage and the released liquids without worrying about overflowing the container.

  4. 4
    Carly says:

    Have you ever made it with purple cabbage?

  5. 5
    Kate says:

    Looks delicious and I’m definitely going to give it a try.

  6. 6
    Marne Rogers says:

    My sister introduced me to homemade kraut this fall and I am in love! I have been jazzing it up with fresh grated turmeric and caraway seed. I save a small leaf of cabbage to place over the cabbage as it is fermenting and have left it at room temp for up to three weeks before eating. Now that is some tangy sauerkraut! I am ready to explore other vegetables.

  7. 7
    Jen says:

    Question! Do you include the liquid from the bowl when you’re packing the veggies into the jar? Or do you leave it behind?

    Also when there is extra liquid generated in the jar, are you supposed to drain it off or leave it/serve it?

    Thanks so much! I have a whole head of cabbage to spare and now I know what to do with it!

    • 7.1
      Marisa says:

      If the liquid will fit into the jar, you use it. You want the surface of the cabbage to be covered with a layer of its juice. If there’s more liquid in the jar as you pack, leave that there.

  8. 8
    Diane says:

    My husband like kraut but I do not. Never thought to make it a quart at a time but I’d be happy to do that for him. Thanks!

  9. 9
    Fran says:

    I have always wanted to try homemade saurkraut but have been afraid to try it. Have you ever left it longer than a week? I’ve read that it should be left for a month, or more on some sites. Do you ever get the “scum” on top, or any discoloration of the cabbage?

    • 9.1
      Marisa says:

      I have left it longer than a week. The amount of time you let it ferment is really up to you. I like a younger kraut, so I stop it earlier rather than later, but it’s truly a matter of taste.

      I find that when you use a weight on your kraut, you don’t get much scum or discoloration because the surface of the cabbage is submerged beneath the liquid.

      • Fran says:

        Great, thank you! I am definitely going to try this. I’ve been looking for a good saurkraut recipe, and this is so easy to follow and looks delicious. Thanks for sharing it!

  10. 10
    Helga G says:

    I made about 3 gallons in fermentation jugs last year. Repacked the finished kraut into quart jars to keep in fridge and shared with neighbors and just finished the last jar last month. I already have the cabbage and carrots to make more this year.

  11. 11

    […] easy sauerkraut, a quart jar at a time – this I can […]

  12. 12
    Vicki B says:

    Can you use a pickle pipe when making this? I just made my first batch!

  13. 13
    Nancy says:

    I plan to make the Carrot and Cabbage Kraut. I just bought a package of the reCap fermenters. I already have the reCap pour caps in regular and wide mouth. I plan to use a wide mouth quart jar for the kraut. Do I still need to weigh the cabbage down with a 4 oz jelly jar? – or is that unnecessary as long as the cabbage is covered? thanks!

    • 13.1
      Marisa says:

      Did you get a fermentation weight along with your fermenters? It is always helpful to have something in there, weighing down the kraut. However, if you don’t want to use the 4 ounce jelly jar, you can push the cabbage down by hand once every day or so.

      • Nancy says:

        thanks for the speedy reply! I can use the small jelly jar – I just wondered if it accomplished anything other than keeping the contents submerged.

  14. 14

    […] variations, it’s hard to run out of great flavor ideas. Here are a few to get started – Cabbage and Carrot Kraut, Hot Pink Jalapeno Garlic Kraut and Beet Ginger Kraut. Fresh cabbage is around May thru […]

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    […] variations, it’s hard to run out of great flavor ideas. Here are a few to get started – Cabbage and Carrot Kraut, Hot Pink Jalapeno Garlic Kraut and Beet Ginger Kraut. Fresh cabbage is around May thru […]

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