Tag Archives | tomato jam

Jams from Three Springs Fruit Farm

Three Springs Fruit Farm November 7, 2016

Right around this time last year, I told you guys about a collaboration I was doing with Ben Wenk from Three Springs Fruit Farm. We were combining his fruit with my recipes in order to create a line of jams and fruit butters that were a little different from the others you find at the farmers market.

We’ve continued to expand our collaboration over the last year and we’re currently up to six different products. They are:

Today only, you can get 15% off your order from Three Springs Fruit Farm by using the code CANVOLUTION. And if you don’t see this until November 29, take heart! You can still get a discount. Use the code FoodInJars now through December 31, 2016 to get 10% off your order.

PS – In other discount news, our friends at Orchard Road are offering 50% off your online order through Tuesday, November 29. Use the code JARS50 for the deal.

 

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Three Springs Fruit Farm + Food in Jars

Three Springs Fruit Farm + Food in Jars Preserves

As so many good things in life do, it started with a conversation at the Headhouse Square Farmers Market. Ben Wenk from Three Springs Fruit Farm was looking for ways to make their line of preserves more interesting and wondered if I had any ideas. I suggested some recipes that I thought might work for large scale production. And thus, a partnership was born.

Food in Jars logo on Tart Cherry Jam

Right now, there are just three preserves that are made with Ben’s fruit and my recipes, but hopefully there will be more. There’s the Salted Brown Sugar Peach Jam, the Tart Cherry Jam, and my classic, beloved, much-celebrated Tomato Jam. You can buy them online as a set of three, or if you’re in the mid-Atlantic region, in person at a farmers market.

These preserves don’t mean you should stop making your own. But it does mean that if you run out of tomato jam in March, you can now get your hands on a few jars to tide you over until tomato season returns.

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CSA Cooking: Smoky, Spicy, Skillet Tomato Jam

half pint tomato jam

Skillet jams really are the best way I know to deal with a couple pounds of rapidly ripening fruit. Today’s batch was a slimmed down, extra spicy and smoky version of my classic tomato jam.

I had just two pounds of mismatched tomatoes from last week’s Philly Foodworks share and with a vacation looming, I’ve been trying to make useful things out of everything that could possibly go bad around here.

2 pounds macerated tomatoes

I chopped up the tomatoes, combined them with 1 1/4 cup of granulated sugar, and let them macerate over night (I do so love breaking up the work of even the smallest batches of preserves into easily manageable pieces).

skillet tomato jam

Then today, I poured the juicy sugared tomatoes into my trusty 12 inch skillet and added 4 tablespoons of bottled lemon juice, 1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger, 2 teaspoons of crushed red pepper flakes, 1 generous teaspoon of smoked paprika, another teaspoon of salt, and 1/4 teaspoon cayenne.

tomato jam in a measuring cup

The tomatoes cooked down over hight heat for just around 20 minutes, until it was glossy, thick, and didn’t look at all watery. Into a trio of half pint jars and processed for 15 minutes, this little batch took less than an hour total of active time.

three half pints tomato jam

Like all tomato jams, this one is good with cheese and crackers, slathered on a burger, eaten with sweet potato fries, or dolloped alongside scrambled eggs.

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Preserves in Action: Egg Sandwich with Spinach and Tomato Jam

finished breakfast sandwich

I realize that there is already one egg sandwich with tomato jam in the archives of this site, but I can’t resist sharing my current favorite incarnation.

eggs and greens

It starts with a pat of butter melted in a very well seasoned cast iron skillet. I bought this square one on eBay many years ago and it’s one of my very favorite pieces of cookeware. Once the butter is just melted, I pour in two beaten eggs and tilt the pan to get an even coating.

While the eggs cook, I line the top of the eggs with spinach leaves. You want to get them in there while the eggs are still quite loose, as then they cook into the eggs and will stay in place when you flip.

adding cheese

Then you ease a spatula under the eggs (taking care to work all around so that you know nothing is sticking) and flip. This takes some practice, but as long as the skillet is well seasoned and you used butter (coconut oil also works), you should be able to do it.

Once the eggs are flipped, I turn off the burner and let the residual heat in the pan do the rest of the cooking. This is also the point at which you add some cheese. Cheddar is nice, but dill havarti or creamy goat cheese are also favorites.

folding eggs with tomato jam

I make one fold and add a goodly dollop of tomato jam. Another good option is a caramelized onion jam (there’s a recipe I like a lot in Preserving by the Pint). Fold again and place between two slices of toasted bread. You can also roll it up into a tortilla if you’re feeling more like a wrap than a sandwich.

bitten sandwich

Then, you wait until the sandwich cools ever so slightly (molten hot cheese burns are no good) and then you dig in. The sandwich makes enough that you could cut it in half and share it with a friend if you’re feeling generous.

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Preserves in Action: Tomato Jam

greens, ricotta and tomato jam on toast

I have fallen into something of a lunchtime routine. I start a couple slices of toast, pull out a jar of tomato jam, and then rummage around, looking for some leftover to add to bridge the toast and jam. Earlier today, I piled the toast high with some leftover braised collards and a little ricotta cheese before spooning on a little jam.

fromage blanc and tomato jam

 

Last week, I spread my toast with a little fromage blanc and then added the the tomato goodness (I also had a giant salad of arugula, baby lettuce, and chopped apple). I’ve also used this same formula with leftover roast chicken, baked tofu, and even cold steamed broccoli.

How are you guys using your preserves these days?

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Classic Tomato Jam Sweetened With Honey

five pounds tomatoes

It’s Monday morning and I’m just getting to the recipe I promised for Friday afternoon. I apologize to those of you who’ve been holding onto tomatoes all weekend in the hopes that this honey-sweetened tomato jam would appear. I have a bad habit of widely underestimating how long things are going to take me to accomplish and sadly, this post was delayed because of my poor estimation skills.

chopped tomatoes

Every since it first appeared on this blog, my friend Amy’s recipe for tomato jam has been one of the most popular things I’ve posted. The original post has hundreds of comments and nearly every time I teach a class or do a book event, someone comes up to me raving about the wonders of tomato jam.

honeyed tomato jam

It’s one of my favorite things as well. I smear it on turkey burgers, serve it with goat cheese, and use it as a dipping sauce for roasted sweet potatoes. Essentially, it’s a very fancy, chunky ketchup-substitute that can be used in all manner of both sweet and savory applications.

finished honey sweetened tomato jam

All summer long, I’ve been pulling out the sugar in many of my favorite recipes and dropping in honey instead. This recipe is the latest to undergo the conversion and I think it might be the most successful swap to date. The slightly honey flavor pairs beautifully with the tomatoes. The spices continue to sing and the yield is comparable to the sugared version. Truly, the only difference I’ve noticed is that this honey sweetened version isn’t as glossy as its counterpart. Happily, the sheen is the only thing that’s missing. The flavor is there in spades.

A couple of things to note. The length of time this jam can spend cooking varies widely. Stay close to the stove, stir regularly, and use a stainless steel pan in case it scorches. Towards the end of cooking, you should be stirring near constantly. You know this jam is finished when there’s no visible water separating out from the fruit. You’ll also hear a slightly sizzling noise as you stir towards the end of cooking. That’s a sign that the sugars have concentrated that the temperature in the pan is elevated beyond the boiling point of water. When you hear that, you are mere moments away from completion. Keep stirring for a moment or two longer and then pull the pan off the heat.

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