Tag Archives | small batch

Sour Cherry Preserves with Bourbon

It’s day two of cherry week and today, I’m sharing one of my favorite recipes from my second cookbook, Preserving by the Pint. For this one, you simmer sour cherries together with sugar, lemon juice, and bourbon together for five or six minutes, until the liquid thickens a little and the cherries are just soft. The alcohol cooks off as the syrup boils, so there’s no lingering booziness, just a little extra richness that helps balance the flavor of the tart cherries.

This exact recipe doesn’t work well with sweet cherries, but one could add a splash of bourbon to this approach, to approximate the flavor.

Make sure to check back tomorrow for another recipe featuring cherries!

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Small Batch Sweet Cherry Lime Jam

To kick off Cherry Week, I’m sharing my small batch recipe for Cherry Lime Jam. This is the recipe I demonstrated last week during my livestream with Jenny from The Domestic Wildflower. This little batch cooks up in 15 minutes and yields two half pints with a little leftover for immediate eating. The flavor of the limes helps balance the intensity of the cherries and makes for a very tasty PB&J.

You can get the recipe and watch the livestream after the jump!

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Small Batch Spiced Blueberry Jam

On tonight’s live broadcast over on Facebook (Monday, June 18, 9 pm ET/6 pm PT), I am going to be making a small batch of spiced blueberry jam. This recipe is super speedy, because blueberries need so little prep and because it’s a small batch (it cooks down in less than 15 minutes!).

I will show you how to process the jars so that it’s shelf stable, but you could also scrape the jam into a couple containers, stash them in the fridge, and eat through them over the course of the next couple months. Perfect for folks who want to make their jam right now!

Oh, and don’t forget about Can Together! This month, we’re focusing on berry preserves. If you make something with berries and post it to social media, make sure to use the hashtag #cantogether so that your fellow jammers and picklers can find you. Let’s keep our preserving community strong!

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Giveaway: Raw Rutes Yaozu 2 Liter Fermenting Crock

Longing for a mini fermenting crock to call your own? Read on to learn about a charming little fermentation vessel and enter for a chance to win one as well! (This is a sponsored post!)

When it comes to fermenting, small batch is the name of my game. As much as I admire the folks who make sauerkraut 25 pounds of cabbage at a time, my space constraints mean that my very largest batches of kraut, kimchi, or brined dilly beans top out at no more than five pounds of total ingredients (and often, much less than that!).

Over the years, this small batch approach has meant that mason jars have been my vessel of choice for fermentation. I do have a 10L crock that I was given years ago, but it’s just too darn big for my workflow (it sits next to my desk and holds my collection of airlocks and jar-sized pickle weights).

Still, I’ve often gazed upon the various large pickle crocks out there with a good deal of envy, wishing that there was one that would work for my small batch life. Amazingly, the folks at Raw Rutes sensed that I was pining for a petite pickling crock and created one (okay, so they didn’t make it just for me. But it’s the perfect size and is so adorable that it feels like the answer to my wish!).

The Raw Rutes Yaozu fermenting crock is small enough to fit on the counter of even the smallest kitchens. Made from natural clay and finished with food-safe white glaze, this little crock feels solid and is easy to use. It comes with a pair of clay weights and a built-in water channel (which means you don’t have to mess around with airlocks).

Best of all, this crocks holds the perfect amount for my household. When the fermentation phase is done, you’ve got between one and two quarts of tasty kraut, kosher dills, or sauerruben to decant into jars, tuck into the fridge, and fork up alongside any number of sandwiches, salads, and soups. As you can see in the picture below, it’s actually not even that much bigger than a quart jar!

At this point, you’re probably thinking, “This all sounds great, Marisa. But how do I get my hands on one of these sweet mini crocks?” You could either head over to the Raw Rutes website and get your order in before the rush. OR, you can take your chances and try to win one of two crocks I’m giving away this week!

Use the widget below to enter the blog giveaway and then head over to Instagram to enter the second giveaway I’m hosting over there. So many chances to win!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Disclosure: This is a sponsored post. The folks at Raw Rutes have compensated me for my time and efforts. However, I only accept sponsored posts from businesses that jive with the mission of Food in Jars (to educate and inspire people to pickle, preserve, and cook from scratch) and Raw Rutes is most decidedly in line with that mission. The thoughts and opinions expressed here are honest and entirely my own.

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Small Batch Nectarine Lime Jam Recipe

On the hunt for a quick, satisfying preservation project? Look no further than this small batch nectarine lime jam recipe!

I love making tiny batches of jam (I often wish I could write a second volume of Preserving by the Pint, because I so enjoy developing small, quick preserving recipes). This one is a three ingredient job, made with just 1 1/2 pounds of nectarines (thanks Washington State Stone Fruit Growers!), a scant cup of sugar, and the zest and juice from a small lime.

Cooked down in a stainless steel skillet, it needs no more than 15 minutes on the stove. You can either process it, or funnel it into a jar, pop it in the fridge, and eat it until it is gone. Fast. Easy. Good.

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June Mastery Challenge: Foraged Berry Jam

Regular Food in Jars contributor Alex Jones is back to share the tale of a tiny batch of jam made from fruit grown right in her West Philly neighborhood. I do love a good forage! – Marisa

When it comes to gardening and foraging, I do my best to hit enough planting milestones in early spring so that I’m not missing out on a particularly delicious spring or summer crop. And I keep an eye on ripening berries and fruits in my neighborhood so I can forage goodies to enjoy and preserve, too.

This spring was a little different. It was my first working as a freelancer, and any hope that I’d have extra time and flexibility to spend on these pursuits quickly vanished — I felt busier and less in touch with what was growing around me than I had been when I was employed full time.

For example, I missed planting peas this year. On the other hand, I got in two good harvests of elderflower during a particularly busy May, a first for me. And yet, I just missed the height of my West Philly neighborhood’s flush of juneberries, mulberries, and sour cherries, which hit a little earlier than usual this month.

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