Tag Archives | pickles

Preserving with Mrs. Wages Pickled Okra and Vegetables Mix

This post is written in partnership with my friends at Mrs. Wages. Hope you enjoy!

This is it, friends. The last big push of the summer canning season. This is the time of year when I do things like make big vats of peach butter (cooking down as I type), scramble to get my hands on the last of the tomatoes, and I take canning help wherever I can get it.

Recently, one of my favorite canner helpers is the Pickled Okra and Vegetables spice mix from Mrs. Wages. It came to my rescue last week, when I was short on time and creativity, but had produce spilling out all over my kitchen.

The beauty of a mix like this is that is allows me to put myself on auto-pilot and just follow the instructions written on the back of the packet.

With this recipe, you prep all the veg. I used carrots, okra, cauliflower, and peppers, just like the instructions told me.

While you’re working breaking down your vegetables into pleasingly similarly sized bits, you pour a bunch of vinegar into a large pot and bring it to a boi.

Look at those peppers! Aren’t they pretty?

This packet makes seven quarts of pickles, so make sure you have a canning pot warming and your jars are prepped.

When your veg is chopped, your jars are warming, and they vinegar is boiling, add the spice mix to the pot.

Now it’s time to make some pickles. You can either toss your vegetables together in a big bowl and pack them into jars, or you can heap them into the brine and warm them up a bit (this transforms the pickle into a hot pack preserve, and helps you squeeze a bit more produce into your jars).

Once the veg and brine is divided between the prepared jars, you wipe the rims, apply the lids and rings, and process. And boom, seven quarts of colorful, delicious pickles (I took a jar to a party last week and they were a big odl hit).

Comments { 2 }

July Mastery Challenge: Pickled Blistered Shishito Peppers

Regular Food in Jars contributor Alex Jones is here to with a recipe to preserve delicious shishito peppers. They’re one of my summer favorites! – Marisa

One of my favorite moments of summer eating doesn’t involve handfuls of blueberries, icy-cold slices of watermelon, or peaches so juicy you have to eat them over the sink. (Although those firsts fruits are up there on the list.) It’s when I spy the first shishito peppers at the farmers’ market.

When I first see those wrinkly, electric green peppers heaped in a basket or bursting out of a fiber pint container, I know I have to have them.

Back my kitchen with my market bounty, I’ll get my cast iron pan ripping hot with a glug of grapeseed oil and add the peppers, cooking for a few minutes on each side until the skin is blistered deep brown and the flesh is just tender. Then, they go into a bowl with a big three-finger pinch of flaky sea salt. A few flicks of the wrist to toss, and then I’ll sit down and eat them all, one by one.

But inevitably, shishito season ends, and it’s rare to find them off-season in supermarkets, so I have to wait for that smoky, salty experience until next year’s pepper feast…unless I can preserve it.

Continue Reading →

Comments { 6 }

Small Batch Bread and Butter Pickles

Last night, I spent an hour in my kitchen making bread and butter pickles and talking to my phone (otherwise known as doing a live broadcast via Facebook). I answered questions, used a mandoline slicer without injuring myself, and at the end had three and a half pints of tasty pickles for my efforts.

I’ve published a few different variations on bread and butter pickles over the years, but have never managed to get one up on the blog. Well, let’s change that. This is the exact version I made last night. It doubles and triples beautifully if you’ve got even more veg to use up. And it’s the perfect thing for this month’s hot pack challenge!

Continue Reading →

Comments { 19 }

Spicy Pickled Green Beans

Flex your cold pack preserving skills with a batch of Spicy Pickled Green Beans. They’re good along side a sandwich and even better pressed into stirring service in a Bloody Mary.

We’re focusing on cold pack preserving this month in the Mastery Challenge and one of my favorite examples of the form is the pickled green bean. I make a lot of these during the summer months when beans are abundant, both because I love them and because they make a really good thing to give to pickle loving friends and family. They also retain their crunch beautifully, which is not something I can say for most processed cucumber pickles.

Pickled green beans are also something of an affordably luxury to my mind. When you make them yourself they’re quite cheap, but they can be outrageously expensive at farmers markets and small grocery stores (you don’t often see them in larger supermarkets). I love when a little time and effort can yield something that feels special.

Green beans are not quite in season yet, so don’t judge the quality of the beans you see before you. I’m sure that the finished pickles will still taste good, but they can be downright sublime when you use those perfect, downy beans available only in high summer.

I typically make them assembly line style, doling out spices and garlic cloves (the more you slice, the more garlic flavor you get) to the jars and then going down the line with beans. Holding the jar at an angle as you pack makes quick work of the initial fill and a wooden chopstick helps ease the way for the last few beans. It’s also an excellent tool for wiggling out air bubbles that get trapped deep in the jar.

Once the jars have spices and green beans, it’s time to fill them up with brine. Apple cider is my vinegar of choice for most things, though some prefer white or red wine vinegar in its place. Any vinegar is fine as long as it has 5% acidity. The spices can also be adjusted to suit. For this batch, I called on brown mustard seeds, dill seed, black peppercorns, red chili flakes for heat, and slivered garlic. Sometimes I make them with cayenne, which tints the brine a pleasing red and makes for bracing eating.

These pickles need just a quick trip through the canner (10 minutes for pints and 15 minutes for anything larger). They often lose a little brine during their bath, but it’s not typically enough to cause distress.

Oh, and just a note on the jars. I used the new pint-sized spiral jars that Ball Canning released this year. I thought they would be awesome for pickles because they’re slightly taller than your average pint. However, I found that their narrow middle was absolutely incensing when it came to thoroughly packing the jars. If you have some of these, use them for your jams, sauces and chutneys and save yourself the annoyance.

Continue Reading →

Comments { 13 }

Mastery Challenge: Rhubarb Pickles

When I see the first harvests of rhubarb hitting farmers’ market tables among still-puny bunches of kale and last season’s root crops, I feel a surge of hope: spring is really, actually happening.

I also think of my maternal grandmother, an almost-nun turned feminist firebrand and mother of 11 who kept a huge vegetable garden — including a big patch of rhubarb — at her house in Quebec when I was a kid. Granny is the reason I turn my nose up at strawberry-rhubarb anything: her lip-puckering, sweet-tart treatment of the ingredient served straight up in pie, cobbler, and roly-poly became my standard and favorite for fruity baked goods.

As an adult, I’ve tried to do more with rhubarb than dessert, but no recipe I’ve come across that didn’t involve sweet, buttery dough has ever really seemed like it would be worth the trouble to try. So when this month’s Mastery Challenge came around during rhubarb season, I decided to give it the cold-pack pickle treatment.

Continue Reading →

Comments { 14 }

Garlicky Kohlrabi Relish

Looking for something easy and delicious to do with the all the kohlrabi you’ve been getting in your CSA share this summer? This garlicky kohlrabi relish is just the ticket!

vertical jars of garlicky kohlrabi relish

Kohlrabi. It’s one of those vegetables that you find primarily at farmers markets and in your CSA baskets. Knobby round balls with gangly stems and oversized leaves, they look a little like disastrously malformed broccoli.

four kohlrabi bulbs

Once you trim away the stems and leaves (try them in your next veggie stir fry) and peel off the tough outer layer, you’re ready to pickle. You can use kohlrabi in a variety of pickle applications, but I particularly like turning them into a shredded relish.

ten cups shredded kohlrabi

This is one of those preserves that is half pickle, half salad. A forkful or two alongside your favorite sausage is nice. Adding it to a cool soba noodle dish is really delicious. And it’s weirdly delicious in an egg sandwich.

four pints of garlicky kohlrabi relish

If you can’t find kohlrabi, peeled broccoli stems have a similar density and flavor and can easily be swapped in.

Continue Reading →

Comments { 10 }