Tag Archives | peach chutney

Peach Chutney with Toasted Whole Spices

It’s day three of Peach Week 2018! Monday, I shared a tiny batch of Peach Cardamom Jam. Yesterday was all about the Peach Walnut Conserve! Today, we’re moving on to chutney. 

I’ve been making versions of this chutney for more than eight years now. I originally devised it using tomatoes and have since made it with plums, pears, and now, peaches. It’s got a seriously assertive flavor, thanks to a healthy dose of vinegar and all those spices.

Often I will tell you that it doesn’t matter how you cut your fruit, but when it comes to this preserve, I advise you to be thoughtful with your cuts so that they are of mostly uniform size. It helps the chutney cook evenly and makes for a really beautiful finished product.

If you follow me on Instagram, you might have spotted this photo, in which I called this my Indian spiced peach chutney. I’ve decided to let that title go, because this preserve is an invention built on things I’ve read and experienced. It has no right to claim any kind of authenticity.

This blog post was written in partnership with the good people at the Washington State Stone Fruit Growers as part of my role as official Canbassador. They sent me 18 pounds of peaches and asked me to preserve them. I’ll be posting peach recipes all week long, so check back tomorrow for the next installment. For more about Washington State Fruit, follow them on social media!

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Honey-Sweetened Peach Chutney

peach chutney

Every summer and fall, I try to make at least two or three batches of chutney. It’s a handy thing to have to tuck into gift bags (it helps to break up the monotony of all the jams) and it makes for a very easy potluck contribution (one log of goat cheese + a jar of chutney + baguette rounds = happy diners). Last year, I did versions with black plums and apricots. So far this year, I’ve made cherry chutney and this batch of honey-sweetened peach chutney with some of the Canbassador fruit.

peach half

Chutney is not one of the condiments I ate during my formative years, but it has grown on me in my adulthood. These days, it’s one of my refrigerator staples and on days when the leftover pickings are slim, I pull out some cheese, make a piece of toast, and grab some chutney. Works every time. Right now, I’m eating the very end of the black plum from last summer, as well as the dregs of the persimmon chutney from this project.

peach quarters

Before you start making this chutney, you should know that when it comes to removing the skin from relatively small amounts of peaches (and tomatoes, too), I’ve changed my strategy. I am no longer a fan of the blanch and chill. Instead, I cut the peaches into quarters and pull out the pits and heap them in a heatproof bowl. While I work, I bring a kettle of water to a boil.

peeling peaches

Once all the peaches are sliced, I pour the boiling water over the fruit. Let it sit for a few minutes, until you see the skins starting to wrinkle. Drain the fruit, rinse with cold tap water, and peel. It works really well and feels easier and more streamlined.

eight cups chopped peaches

The only thing I can’t stress enough is the importance of using a the heatproof bowl. One very distracted evening, I used a glass bowl that I thought was Pyrex. It was not and it shattered from the hot water. I was able to salvage some of the fruit, but it made a mess and was generally unfortunate.

chutney on the stove

Cooking times can vary a great deal with chutney. I always plan a secondary kitchen project when I have a batch going, so that I can stay close to the pot and give it a good stir every few minutes. It has a tendency to stick on the bottom as the cooking time nears its end, so try stay focused in those last moments of simmering.

peach chutney with honey

The only other useful tip I have to share when it comes to chutney is that it’s best to open a sealed jar an hour or so before you plan on serving it. When you first open chutney, all you can taste is the vinegar. However, if you let it breathe a little, the vinegar dissipates a little and the flavors of the fruit and spices are more prominent.

How do you like to eat chutney?

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