Tag Archives | New York City

Upcoming Events: New York! Philadelphia! Toronto!

plums in a bowl

These next few weeks are the final big push before I hunker down and start developing recipes again (because, have I mentioned that I’m writing another book? This one is all about preserving with natural sweeteners and I think you guys are going to like it a lot). However, there are still more fun classes and events before the true recipe development begins! Here’s where I’ll be in the coming days.

 

September 6 – New York City
This Saturday, I’ll be at the Union Square Greenmarket from 11 am to 2 pm, offering up samples of jam and selling/signing copies of both Preserving by the Pint and Food in Jars (of course, I am always happy to sign the copies you already own as well). If you’re in the greater New York City area, I’d love to see you there.

September 9 – Philadelphia
This  Pickles Two Ways class is my final session in the series I’ve been teaching all summer for the Weaver’s Way Co-op. The class is held at the Chestnut Hill Friends Meetinghouse and runs from 7-9 pm. Click here to sign up.

September 11 – Toronto, Canada
This is the first class of my four-day stay in Toronto (thanks to Joel MacCharles and Dana Harrison from Well Preserved, for making the dream of this trip into a reality), 7-9 pm. I’ll be demonstrating my small batch jam making method and will bring a couple of jars to share as well. Class is at F’Coffee and costs $45 CAD. Click here to sign up.

September 12 – Toronto, Canada
On my second night, I’ll be teaching at  Nella Cucina from 6:30-9 pm. I’ll make a small batch of jam for tasting and everyone will make their own jar of pickles to take home. Click here to sign up.

September 13 – Toronto, Canada
On Saturday, Joel and I are teaming up to offer a session that will dig into the work required to write a cookbook. I’ll tell you all the things I’ve learned having now done this twice, and Joel will share his very fresh experience as a first-time author. The session is from 10:30 am to 12 noon and costs $45 CAD. You can sign up here.

September 14 – Toronto, Canada
From 11 am to 5 pm Sunday is The Home Ec Big Outdoor Kitchen Party. This one-day food festival is designed to celebrate the small kitchens, independent producers, and local food champions who bring richness to the Toronto food scene. This free event will be held at the Harbourfront Centre and is something Joel and Dana have been planning for a very long time now. I am so excited to be a part of it.

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A Visit to Korin + Giveaway

Korin

This is just one side of the knife section. There is an equally extensive display on the opposite wall.

Last Wednesday, I hopped on a double decker Megabus and rode to New York in order to learn about knives. Many months ago, I’d gotten an email inviting me to visit Korin, a Japanese tableware and knife store and finally the day had arrived for my trip. As a fan of good kitchen knives, I was incredibly excited to learn a little more about the breadth of knives available out there.

Korin

Located downtown near City Hall, Korin has been in the business of knives and tableware for 30 years. A family operation, the store was initially open only by appointment to the restaurant trade (they currently work with the likes of Nobu, Grammercy Tavern and Per Se) but in recent years, the shop has been open daily to the public as well.

Korin

In addition to selling an incredibly vast array of knives and tableware, they also offer sharpening services using a variety of Japanese water stones. They can sharpen and repair nearly any type or style of knife, save those with a serrated edge. Having seen what they were able to do with some of my more beat-up knives, I am a true believer as to what a good sharpening can do. There is no one that I know of in Philadelphia producing this level of edge quality. Happily, you can mail your knives to Korin should you not live near enough to drop in for sharpening.

Korin

Korin sells Western-style knives, traditional Japanese knives and a Japanese-Western hybrid. The difference between these knives is in the edge. Western edges are sharpened so that they have a symmetrical edge. This offers a blade that is fairly durable and relatively easy to maintain. Japanese knives are traditionally sharpened on just one side of the knife. This makes for an incredibly sharp edge, but not as easy for the home cook to maintain.

Korin

This is Knife Master Sugai, demonstrating the proper sharpening technique.

Then there’s the hybrid knife. Made of thin, high-grade steel, the edge is sharpened to an asymmetrical edge that leads to a sharper, more durable blade. The only issue with selecting a knife with an asymmetrical edge is if you have multiple cooks in your household who have different dominant hands. These knives are sharpened differently for righties and lefties. Just something to keep in mind.

Korin

This incredibly long blade is designed to be used to break down whole tuna. It's a two-person operation. One maneuvers the knife and the other moves the tuna.

One of the things that my hosts stressed when showing me through the knives was the fact that in Japanese culinary culture, there are different knives for different tasks. The giant knife with the extended blade in this picture? It is designed for cutting soba noodles. Thicker blades are designated for butchering, while thinner ones are for making more precision cut. Blade shapes also vary depending on region and maker.

Korin

One blade that I fell particularly in love with while visiting Korin was the Petty knife. It’s seen as an analog to the paring knife, as it’s both light and highly maneuverable. However, as you can see (it’s pictured below), it’s got a longer blade that you typically find on a Western paring knife. Since introducing it to my kitchen a week ago, it’s rapidly become my favorite knife for quick tasks like slicing up an apple.

Korin

The kind folks at Korin sent me home with two of these Petty knives (if you’re curious, it’s this one), one to keep and one to give away to a reader. If you’re interesting in a chance to win this gorgeous knife, here’s what to do.

  1. To enter the giveaway, leave a comment on this post and tell us about your favorite kitchen tool.
  2. Comments will close at 11:59 pm eastern time on Thursday, March 1, 2012. Winner will be chosen at random (using random.org) and will be posted to the blog on Friday, March 2, 2012.
  3. Giveaway is open to U.S. and Canadian readers.
  4. One entry/comment per person, please.
Disclosure: Korin gave me two knives; one to keep and one for this giveaway. My opinions remain entirely my own.