Tag Archives | MightyNest

Links: Berry Jams and Cucumber Soup

box of open jars

Last week was intense. Between the photo shoot for the new book, finishing edits on the manuscript, recording audio for a new podcasting project, and also staying present and focused for my husband and mother-in-law as they dealt with her health struggles, I ended the week feeling pretty spent. I’ve spent most of today cleaning up the apartment, doing some closet purging, and trying to get myself back on track.

Here are a few of the links I’ve collected for you!

peaches in jars

No giveaway winners this week, because the MightyNest giveaway is still in progress. If you haven’t entered yet, now’s the time!

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Home Canned Peaches in Fruit Juice + MightyNest Giveaway

This post is sponsored by our friends at MightyNest! Read through to the end for details about a giveaway worth $200!

row of jars side

There is a park near my apartment that hosts two weekly farmers markets. I almost always go to the Saturday market, but often miss the mid-week one. It takes place on Tuesdays from 10 am to 2 pm and so often, by the time I remember that it’s happening, I’ve already missed it.

empty week jars

Last week, though, the stars were aligned in my favor. I had been out running errands and on my walk home spotted the cheery row of white tents set up along the north edge of the square. It was nearly 2 pm, but the vendors all still had good things on offer. I bought three quarts of yellow and green beans for pickling, a half pint of black raspberries, and five pounds of hail-marked peaches for $5.

four pounds peaches

The peaches were a little beat up but it was nothing some careful work with a paring knife couldn’t fix. I set them out to ripen for a couple days and applied myself to the rest of the produce. I trimmed the beans, fit them into a large jar with garlic and spices, and covered them with brine (we’ll talk more about those next week when they’re finished fermenting). The raspberries? Those I ate with my lunch.

peach quarters

A few days later, the peaches were ripe and ready for canning (and eating! I did set aside a few for snacking). I considered turning them into jam, but I just discovered a cache of peach vanilla jam in the back of the cabinet, so that seemed unnecessary. Instead, I decided to can them in fruit juice for later in the year when all available fruit is being shipped from the other side of the world.

apple juice

Over the years, I’ve preserved fruit slices in syrups made from cane sugar, honey, and agave nectar, but when it comes to ease and virtue, there’s nothing better than plain old apple juice. When I first started working on my natural sweeteners book, I got into the habit of keeping a few canisters of 100% juice concentrate in the freezer because they’re so useful during canning season.

peaches in juice

I prepped the peaches by cutting them in quarters and laying them in a heatproof baking dish. Once they were ready, I put the pan in the sink (to help prevent large messes), brought a kettle of water to a boil and poured it over the peaches. This helps loosen the skins and when you’re working with relatively small amounts of peaches, makes for an easier peeling process.

peaches in jars

Once the peach quarters had sat in the hot water for about three minutes, I lifted a corner of the pan and tipped out most of the hot water. Then I ran some cool water from the tap over the fruit. Then, I peeled the skins off the peach segments. They lifted away easily enough, though some benefited from a little paring knife assistance.

peaches in jars top

I’d prepped the juice ahead of time (using the regular dilution of one can of concentrate to three cans of water) and brought it to a simmer in a four quart pot. After each peach segment was peeled, I dropped it into the hot juice. The acid content in the juice is enough to help prevent oxidation, and the heat helps the fruit release some of its trapped air, making for a finished product that should siphon less that peaches that were done using the cold pack method.

single jar of peaches

Once all the peaches were peeled and in the simmering juice, I pulled three clean, hot 1/2 liter Weck tulip jarsout of my prepped canning pot and filled them with peach slices. I ladled in enough juice to cover, leaving about 1/4 inch headspace (make sure to wiggle out any trapped air bubbles).

Finally, I wiped the rims, eased on the seals and lids, and clamped them in place with the metal clips. Because they were a hot packed product, these jars (which are the functional equivalent of pint jars) spent just 20 minutes in a boiling water bath canner.

finished peaches

Once the time was up, I slide the pot off the hot burner, removed the lid, and let the jars cool for ten minutes still in the water. This is another way to help prevent the siphoning of the liquid to which whole fruit is so prone.

Finally, I pulled the jars out of the water and let them rest on a folded kitchen towel. You can always tell with Weck jars that they’ve formed a seal because the little rubber tab will point downward.

down turned tab

Now, here’s the fun part. Our friends at MightyNest are huge canning fans and want to help one lucky Food in Jars reader get set up for a very successful canning season. To that end, they’re letting me give away a canning pot, jar lifter, stainless funnel, and an assortment of jars. The total value is $200. Just plug your information into the widget below to enter.

Disclosure: MightyNest is a Food in Jars sponsor. Additionally, they provided the Weck jars you see featured in this post. However, all opinions remain entirely mine.

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June Sponsors: Cuppow, iLids, Fillmore Container, MightyNest, Mrs. Wages, Fermentools, and Preserving Now

pickled carrots fermentools

Happy first of June! The change in calendar means it is time to thank those companies who help support Food in Jars. It would not be sustainable for me to write here so often without their support! If you like something they do, please do follow a link or two and show them that you care.

Cuppow is the creator of the original mason jar travel mug topper and the BNTO, a small plastic cup that transforms a canning jar into a snack or lunch box. They also recently expanded their product line to include branded jar coozie (which I’ve been using non-stop) and they’ve teamed up with the EIO Kids Cup folks to bring the manufacturing of that kids drinking system onto US soil.

iLids is a Seattle-based small business that makes both storage and drink lids in both regular and wide mouth sizes for mason jars. Their storage lids are water tight and the drink lids can accommodate a straw. Add some to your kitchen today!

Fillmore Container is a family-owned business based in Lancaster, PA and sells all manner of canning jars, lids, and other preservation gear. Check out the recipe for low-sugar strawberry rhubarb jam they recently posted on their blog.

MightyNest is an amazing resource for non-toxic, natural, and organic products for homes and families. If you’re looking to stay hydrated this summer, make sure to check out all their selection of reusable water bottles.

Mrs. Wages makes pectin, vinegar, and more canning mixes than I can count. Their website is an incredible preserving resource and I can’t say enough good things about their salsa mix. Make sure to sign up for their newsletter for monthly installments of canning goodness.

Fermentools offers a brilliant fermentation starter kit that involves a heavy-duty glass pickling weight, an airlock, a lid with a reusable rubber seal, and mineral-rich salt. I’m using one as I type for a batch of pickled carrots. Get one (or several!) before the summer growing season gets going!

Preserving Now is a small business based in Atlanta, Georgia run by Lyn Deardorff. This summer, in addition to teaching her regular Canning Immersion Classes, Lyn has added a Summer Preserving Series at Serenbe in Atlanta and Nashville. Each class in the series features both a seasonal fruit preserve and a pickle or relish.

If your company or small business is interested in becoming a sponsor, you can find more details here. I offer discounts for multiple month purchases and am always happy to work with your budget.

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Giveaway: The Preservationist Gift Set from MightyNest

FIJset 640

I hope everyone had a very happy Thanksgiving yesterday! As today marks the traditional beginning of the holiday shopping season, I’m sharing some very fun gift ideas from our friends at MightyNest. They’ve teamed up with four cookbook authors/bloggers to create gift-ready kits for your favorite people.

There’s a Blender Girl set (for your juice and smoothie fans), the Traditionalist set from Jenny at Nourished Kitchen, a Real Foodie set filled with Lisa Leake’s favorites, and the Preservationist set, which includes the 4th burner pot, a case of mini tulip Weck jars, and a copy of Preserving by the Pint.

mightynest image

The Preservationist set costs just $85.90 and would make a really good gift for someone who wanted to get started with small batch preserving! Another great thing about buying from MightyNest this weekend is that they are giving back 20% of your entire to the school of your choice through Monday, December 1. That means that if you buy the Preservationist set, $17 will go back to whichever school you select.

preservationist set image

And because no Black Friday is complete without a giveaway, the folks at MightyNest have given me one of the Preservationist kits to give away to a Food in Jars reader. Just click on the pledge below to entire. Happy shopping!

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Giveaway: Bake Your Bundt Off with MightyNest

warm glass bundt pan

This blog post is sponsored by MightyNest. They are an online retailer with a mission to provide the natural, organic, and non-toxic products that parents seek for their home while also giving back to schools.

offset bundt

I like glassware. Truly, this should come as no surprise to anyone who has read this blog for longer than five minutes. I love a good jar like nobody’s business. I’m a big fan of vintage glass Pyrex bowls and bakers, as well as the newer glass food storage containers. I’m even a sucker for a well-made drinking glass (oh Duralex Picardie, you will always have my heart).

buttered bundt

So, when the non-toxic avengers over at MightyNest asked if I might be interested in replacing my ancient avocado green, Teflon-coated bundt pan with one made of glass, I was helpless to resist. I said yes and signed on to participate in their “Bake Your Bundt Off” promotion.

chopped walnuts

The bundt pan arrived late last week and it sat on my coffee table for most of the weekend, looking more like modern art than bakeware. I had an itch to bake, but wanted to make sure that I chose just the right thing for the maiden voyage of this glamorous pan. Needing to use a recipe from a cookbook I owned (Scott and I have been purging books lately, and so if it’s not getting used, it can’t stay), I turned to Eat Your Books and searched for bundt recipes.

filled bundt

The search turned up a number of options, but wanting to incorporate the flavors of fall, nothing sounded more perfectly on the nose than Dorie Greenspan’s recipe for Double Apple Bundt Cake (it’s from her fabulous book, Baking). I made just a few small changes, it is essentially still hers.

I swapped out some of the AP flour for whole wheat, reduced the sugar a tiny bit, and used my own homemade apple butter for the store bought version for which she calls (and any time I can shoehorn homemade preserves into a baked good, I am a happy girl).

baked bundt

I also skipped any kind of frosting, because I want to be able to justify eating a slice of this cake for breakfast, and I just can’t make the rationalization work if it’s got a powdered sugar glaze drizzled over the top.

And just a note about the slight bits of char on my cake. This is not the pan’s fault. I forgot to set a timer after deciding that it needed a few more minutes. I got distracted and let five minutes turn into more than ten (and I am not the type to remake a cake for pictures). Happily, thanks to the apple butter and grated apple, the cake was still entirely moist inside. I just use a serrated edge knife to scrape away the worst of the burnt bits before eating.

unmolded bundt

Another reason this particular cake spoke to me was that Dorie mentions that it improves in both taste and texture when you let it rest for a bit. I keep a mental list of baked goods that just get better over time, because they allow me to take advantage of a sliver of free time mid-week to bake for parties and gatherings scheduled for the weekend.

bundt giveaway gear

So, on to the giveaway portion of this post. MightyNest is offering one lucky Food in Jars reader a chance to win a 10 inch glass bundt pan, a Cakebox (from the makers of Piebox), a sweet tea towel, and a sturdy stainless brownie spatula (also good for cake!).

open cakebox

The prize pack has a retail value of $100, and to sweeten the deal, MightyNest is also going to donate $100 to the winner’s school of choice. It’s a mighty good deal. Use the widget below to enter.

A little more about MightyNest, the sponsor of this post:

Everything they sell is selected with the highest standards for safety and quality. Glass and stainless baking gear and food storage. Green cleaning supplies. Natural bath products, and other home essentials. And everything is selected to be free from known toxic ingredients such as: BPA, PVC, Phthalates, Lead, Formaldehyde, flame retardants, Parabens and more.

Anytime you order from MightyNest, they’ll give 15% back to the school of your choice. It’s a great way to be healthier and support your local school.

sliced bundt in box

Disclosure: This is a sponsored post. MightyNest sent me a set of the gear that we’re giving away and is also an occasional Food in Jars sponsor.

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MightyNest, 4th Burner Pots, & a Preserving by the Pint Giveaway

4th burner pot

Back in April, I teamed up with my friends at MightyNest for a canning party at a fabulous cooking school in Evanston called Now We’re Cookin’. I made a batch of my honey-sweetened strawberry jam for the gathered audience and signed a bunch of books. MightyNest held on to a small cache of those signed books and is currently giving one away (along with six pretty tulip-shaped Weck jars and a sturdy bamboo cutting board). The giveaway ends today (all this travel has me off my blogging game) and so if you want to enter, please head over to this blog post right now!

Another thing came out of that night in Evanston. The MightyNest team was so taken with my 4th burner pot (I tucked it into my checked luggage and brought it with me on that trip) that they’ve added them to their product line. This is my favorite piece of cookware for small batch canning. I use it as a canning pot. I heat up my pickling liquid in it. I use it as a tea kettle when canning tomatoes and other water packed vegetables. It’s versatile, it’s sturdy, and it only costs $40.

Updated to add: The MightyNest folks just sent me the code for the widget, so you can now enter the giveaway right here!

*Just so you know, MightyNest is a Food in Jars sponsor. However, I loved their products and their team long before they started sending a few bucks my way to help support this site. They are good people.

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