Tag Archives | metropolitan bakery

Cookbooks: Metropolitan Bakery 20 For 20

Metro bakery cookbooks

One of my favorite things about my neighborhood is the Metropolitan Bakery. They bake the most glorious breads and pastries (I’m a fool for their millet muffins and fennel soft pretzels), have a refrigerator case stocked with free range eggs, local dairy products, and produce, and serve as a pick-up location for a number of area CSA shares. I’m in there at least once a week (if not more).

focaccia

In 2003 after ten years in business, they published a really nice cookbook that featured a number of their greatest hits from the bakery, including those millet muffins (I wrote about them back in the first year of this site). Amazon has a number of used copies, or you can get a shiny new one directly from Metropolitan.

Panna Cotta

Recently, Metropolitan opened up a cafe next door to their Rittenhouse bakery that serves an array of sandwiches, soups, salads, coffee drinks, and desserts. In concert with that opening, they’ve put out a new collection of recipes. Called Metropolitan Bakery 20 For 20 (that means 20 new recipes for their 20th anniversary), it features recipes from the new cafe as well as a handful from the bakery.

Homemade Cream Cheese

The book has the feel of a high end quarterly magazine and is gorgeously photographed and designed. The recipe selection is eclectic and features such things as fermented dill pickles, bay leaf panna cotta with candied kumquats, homemade cream cheese, and pink peppercorn shortbread. Oh, and if you do get your hands on a copy of this book, don’t miss the salted chocolate cherry cookies in the very back. They are one of my very favorite things.

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Preserves in Action: Baguette with Ricotta, Fig Jam, and Baby Arugula

baguette with ricotta, fig jam, arugula

On Monday night, I took a cheese class at Metropolitan Bakery with Madame Fromage and Sue Miller of Birchrun Hills Farm (she is one of my very favorite Pennsylvania cheesemakers). It came just after a weekend in which I had taught and demo-ed enough to make my voice go hoarse, so it was doubly nice to sit back and let someone else do the teaching and explaining.

We began the tasting with an orienting sip of Birchrun’s raw milk, just hours from the cow and then, starting with fromage blanc, we sampled our way through six cheeses. There were slices of baguette and French berry roll from the Metropolitan ovens, and at the end, a little splash of madeira to drink with slices of Birchrun blue. It was one of the nicest evenings I’ve had in a while.

baguette with ricotta, fig jam, arugula

At the end of the class, we were packed off into a chilly night with warm cheeks and fresh baguettes. Scott is currently off carbs, so the work of eating this pointy loaf has been entirely mine (truly, it’s not a hardship). This morning, when I opened the paper bag, it was quite hard. Happily, I have a trick for refreshing bread that always works with Metropolitan’s loaves (they use a long fermentation period, which builds the interior structure and makes it more resilient).

I hacked off a chunk, sliced it down the middle and ran the pieces quickly under a dribbling kitchen faucet. I toasted the slices twice, once to help dry them out and again to give them some color. The end result is four-day-old toasted baguette that is flavorful, with just the right amount of crunch and chew.

Now, here’s where the Preserves in Action component comes in. I spread the toasts with fresh ricotta cheese (what I really longed for was Sue’s fromage blanc, but Claudio’s ricotta is a more than acceptable substitute), dolloped on fig jam, and piled up baby arugula. I added a few turns of a pepper grinder and breakfast was ready. This meal could easily serve as lunch, or if cut into smaller pieces, as a starter for a party.

Curious why I know so much about this bakery’s practices? Many moons ago, Scott and I used to make an online cooking show called Fork You and in one episode, we visited Metropolitan’s baking facility and made bread with James Barrett, one of the founders. The old blog appears to be corrupted, but the video is still available on Viddler’s blog if you’re interested in finding out more about them (and seeing the glasses I was wearing five years ago).

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Millet in Jars and Muffins

Millet Muffins

One thing I’ve learned over the years is that one person’s staple grain can be totally exotic, foreign or just plain unnecessary to the next person. For instance, my mom always has some Cream of Wheat in her pantry rotation. That’s one I skip, preferring steel cut oats or hull-less barley for breakfast (although lightly buttered and salted Cream of Wheat with a poached egg on top is one of my beloved childhood comfort foods).

In the last few years, millet has crept into my grain rotation and is now a very definite canning jar staple (along with short grain brown rice and quinoa) in my kitchen. The thing I love about millet is that it has a multitude of applications. When it’s steamed, it become light and fluffy, a cross between polenta and broken rice. When toasted, it becomes a nutty addition to pancakes, waffles, muffins and scones.

Millet in a jar

It was the Metropolitan Bakery (Fork You toured their factory last summer, here’s the video from that day) that opened my eyes to toasted millet and the ways in which can add the perfect gentle crunch to baked goods. They make an amazing millet muffins, and it was those muffins that inspired me to add toasted millet to anything that would stand still.

Toasting millet is really easy. Most of the time, I do it in small batches in the toaster oven, cooking it at 350 degrees for 15-20 minutes on a dry baking sheet. The only thing to remember is that to get the best crunch from your millet, you need to make sure you toast at least half an hour prior to stirring the millet into the batter, so that it has time to cool and firm up. Also, don’t worry if it looks like it’s smoking, it’s actually steam that occurs as the moisture inside the millet dries and escapes (of course, if it’s starting to look blackened, then it is smoke. Use your judgment).

If millet is one of your staple grains, how do you like to use it? For those of you for whom it’s new, do you have any questions?

My adaptation of Metropolitan Bakery’s millet muffin recipe is after the jump…

These muffins are particularly good with a dab of Honey Lemon Marmalade.

Just sayin’.

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