Tag Archives | giveaway

Giveaway: Core Kitchen Silicone Utensils and Funnels

Core Kitchen tools

It used to be that I was singularly devoted to my wooden spoons and spatulas for just about every kitchen task. I stirred soup with well-worn spoons and had a wooden spatula that was permanently dyed purple from all the batches of blueberry jam it had known.

But then, my allegiances started to shift. I don’t know exactly when it started, but somewhere along the way I became a silicone utensil girl. I love my fully encased silicone spatulas for stirring jam, and have a favorite silicone turner that I use nearly every day for scrambling eggs.

I love these tools because they are one-piece (instead of being silicone or rubber heads perched on wooden or plastic handles), won’t melt in a hot pan, and can go right into the dish washer.

Core Kitchen funnels

Recently, I got an email from Core Kitchen, asking me if I’d be interested in trying some of their tools. I took a quick look at their website, spotted their line of Essential Silicone Utensils and immediately said yes. They sent me a package that included four silicone tools and their set of funnels.

I’ve spent some time with these tools in my kitchen and I really enjoy using them. I particularly appreciate them when it comes to scraping out every last drop of jam from the pan. They are super flexible and bend nicely with the shape of the pan.

The funnels have also proven to be invaluable, particularly the small wide mouth funnel. When I’m filling jars with relatively small mouths (like the lug lidded jars I wrote about here), I put the silicone funnel in the jar first and then perch a regular wide mouth funnel in on top of it. That way, I get all the surface area of my standard funnel, but I’m able to fill the narrower jars without spilling.

The generous folks at Core Kitchen have offered to give away one Food in Jars reader the very same set of utensils and funnels that they sent me. The set includes an All Purpose Spatula, a Pointed Spatula, a Spreader, a Dual-Ended Spatula, and a 3-Piece Funnel Set.

Here’s how to enter.

  1. Leave a comment on this post and tell me what your favorite material is for kitchen utensils. Wood, silicone, plastic, metal, or something else?
  2. Comments will close at 11:59 pm on Saturday, June 14, 2014. Winners will be chosen at random and will be posted to the blog on Sunday, June 15, 2014
  3. Giveaway open to United States residents only.
  4. One comment per person, please. Entries must be left via the comment form on the blog at the bottom of this post.

Disclosure: Core Kitchen gave me the tools you see pictured above and are also giving the same set of tools to one blog reader, all at no cost to me. However, all opinions expressed remain entirely my own. 

Pacific Merchants 10L Pickle Crock + Giveaway

pickling crock square

I made my first batch of sauerkraut in the fall of 2008 (in fact, that single jar of kraut was the first thing I ever wrote about here on Food in Jars). Since then, I’ve done a goodly amount of fermentation, from kosher dill pickles to kombucha to kimchi.

In all the years that I’ve been letting various fruits and vegetables gently bubble away in my kitchen, my vessel of choice has been a wide mouth jar (either a quart or a half gallon, depending on the volume I’m making). And while these jars have served me admirably, there was part of me that always wanted to try out a dedicated pickling crock.

crock overhead

So, when a rep from Pacific Merchants got in touch and asked if I’d be interested in trying out their 10L fermentation crock, I said yes.

It is a lovely crock, with thick walls, stone weights, and a gutter that you fill with water for an airtight seal. This crock, along will all the other stoneware vessels that Pacific Merchants sells, was made in Boleslawiec, Poland.

pickling crock open

You can use crocks like this one for all manner of ferments and I’m planning to christen it with a batch of sauerkraut. I’d intended to start a batch in it before this post, but I head out of town next week for nearly three weeks on the road and Scott asked that I not make him responsible for a large-scale ferment. I thought it was a fair request and so will start a batch (with step-by-step pictures for you all) when I get back in July.

pickle weights

Now, for the giveaway. The nice folks at Pacific Merchants are offering one lucky Food in Jars winner a $100 gift card for their website. What’s more, they’re also offering a discount code for their website. It’s good now through June 16. Just type in “foodinjars15″ at check out for 15% off your order.

Here’s how to enter the giveaway:

  1. Leave a comment on this post and tell me about your fermentation habits. Do you make your own lacto-fermented pickles? Do you have a jar of kimchi in the kitchen right now? Or is your only contact with a fermented vegetable is the tray of warm sauerkraut designed to top hot dogs at the ball park?
  2. Comments will close at 11:59 pm on Saturday, June 7, 2014. Winners will be chosen at random and will be posted to the blog on Sunday, June 8, 2014
  3. Giveaway open to United States residents only.
  4. One comment per person, please. Entries must be left via the comment form on the blog at the bottom of this post.

Disclosure: Pacific Merchants sent me the 10L fermentation crock, along with a pair of 1L Kilner jars, for photography and review purposes. They are also providing the giveaway unit. They have not compensated me beyond that to write this post and all opinions remain my own. 

Flash Giveaway: Meals On Wheels Delaware Annual Meals from the Masters

Image courtesy of Meals on Wheels Delaware

Image courtesy of Meals on Wheels Delaware

I’ve got something a little bit out ordinary for you guys this weekend. The nice folks from Meals on Wheels Delaware asked me if I’d help spread the word about their annual Meals from the Masters weekend of events and so have given me some tickets to give way. It’s their premiere fundraiser and is an awesome way to support a really worthy cause while also getting to try some delicious food.

I have two tickets to Evening with the Masters ($150 value) on Friday, April 25 and two tickets to the Celebrity Chefs’ Brunch ($350 value) on Sunday, April 27 to giveaway.

Entrants need to be able to get themselves to Wilmington, DE for these events because travel is sadly not included. Here’s how to enter.

  1. Leave a comment on this post and tell me why you want to attend this event!
  2. Comments will close at 11:59 pm on Monday, April 14, 2014. Winners will be chosen at random and will be contacted.
  3. Giveaway open to US residents only.
  4. One comment per person, please. Entries must be left via the comment form on the blog at the bottom of this post.

Disclosure: Meals on Wheels Delaware is providing the tickets for this giveaway. They have not paid for placement.

Giveaway: Cutco Five Inch Petite Santoku

Cutco small santoku 2

While in Chicago a few weeks ago, I attended a fancy lunch that included hibiscus cocktails, lots of happy networking, and a most generous gift bag. Included in the tote of goodness was a Cutco Petite Santoku knife that I was very excited to take home with me (I even checked my previously carried on bag in order to hang on to it).

It’s rapidly become an oft-used knife in our kitchen for small tasks. I make scrambled eggs for Scott with some sort of chopped deli meat every morning and it’s the perfect for cubing up the ham or pastrami. I also like it for quartering apples, cutting carrot sticks, and splitting grapefruits into quarters.

holding the small Cutco

I’ve been using a handful of Cutco knives since 2010 when I first encountered them at a food show in New York. Four years on, those knives have proven to be sturdy, reliable and continue to earn their place on our knife strip (and I am ruthless about ditching knives that don’t pull their weight).

Because I’ve been so pleased with them, I’m delighted to host a Cutco giveaway in the hopes that some of you might find yourself equally smitten. This week, I have five of these Cutco Petite Santoku knife to share with five winners. Here’s how to enter.

  1. Leave a comment on this post and share a knife story. What’s your current cutlery situation? How do you get your knives ready for canning season? What’s happening on your knife strip these days?
  2. Comments will close at 11:59 pm on Saturday, April 12, 2014. Winners will be chosen at random and will be posted to the blog on Sunday, April 13, 2014.
  3. Giveaway open to US residents only.
  4. One comment per person, please. Entries must be left via the comment form on the blog at the bottom of this post.

Cutco Cutlery Social Media!

To keep up to date with all the Cutco happenings, make sure to follow them on social media. They occasionally host their own giveaways and other promotions, and that’s the very best way to stay in the know. You can find them on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest.

Disclosure: As mentioned above, the nice folks at Cutco gave me the knife you see pictured above at a blogger event in Chicago a couple weeks ago and are providing the knives for this giveaway. They did not pay to be mentioned here and my opinions are entirely my own. 

Giveaway: Foundation Salt Set from The Meadow

Foundation Salt Set - Food in Jars

Salt has forever been an essential ingredient in food preservation. It plays a key role in pickling, whether you’re fermenting or using vinegar, and has also long been used to preserve meat and fish.

As canners, one of the things we often hear is that pickling salt is the only way to go. And while it’s true that it dissolves quickly and doesn’t contain any additives that could discolor your pickles, I believe there are places for a variety of salts in the home preserver’s toolbox.

Fleur de Sel - Food in Jars

For the last few summers, I’ve made all my pickles with fine grain sea salts like this Fleur de Sel from The Meadow. I measure it out by weight in order to ensure that I don’t oversalt my dilly bean and cucumber dills (more on how to swap salts by weight in this post from 2010) and the finished pickles are fabulous and the quality of the brine suffers not at all from the salt substitution.

Sel Gris - Food in Jars

When I want to incorporate chunkier, more mineral-flavored salts like Sel Gris in my preserving, I opt for a batch of Herbs Salees (it’s best done in high summer, when tender herbs can be had for a song). I have a version of salt preserved herbs in my new cookbook, or you can try the technique on Well Preserved. They add incredible flavor to soups and stews.

Flake Salt - Food in Jars

Recently, the folks at The Meadow sent me their Foundation Salt Set (it retails for $40. If that feels too spendy, maybe their Mini Foundation Set at $20 might suit your budget?) and a little jar of deeply smoked sea salt to play with. I’ve been a customer of theirs since 2009, but their inventory is so deep that other that the Fleur de Sel, all the salts were new to me.

I have two pickle recipes going up later this week that feature these interesting salts, so stay tuned for those. However, in the mean time, let’s have a giveaway! The Meadow is offering up one of their Foundation Salt Sets to one lucky Food in Jars reader. Here’s how to enter:

  1. Leave a comment on this post and share a salty tidbit. Do you have a favorite salt? Have you ever tried making your own sea salt? Tell me something about your relationship with salt.
  2. Comments will close at 11:59 pm on Saturday, April 5, 2014. Winners will be chosen at random and will be posted to the blog on Sunday, April 6, 2014.
  3. Giveaway open to US residents only.
  4. One comment per person, please. Entries must be left via the comment form on the blog at the bottom of this post.

Disclosure: The Meadow sent me some salt to use and photograph and are also providing a set for the winner of this giveaway. However, they did not pay to be featured here on this blog and all opinions expressed here are mine and mine alone.

A Peek Inside Preserving by the Pint + Giveaway

Preserving by the Pint cover - Food in Jars

I’ve been showing you all the cover of my new book, Preserving by the Pint, for months now. I thought that since today is its official release date (though Amazon makes such things mostly moot by shipping pre-orders as soon as it has them in stock), it might be fun to show you what it looks like on the inside.

Preserving by the Pint inside spread - Food in Jars

This book is full of tiny batches and was written with farmers market shoppers, CSA subscribers, and container gardeners in mind (though truly, if you’re not among those groups, the book is still for you). All the recipes start with either a pint, a quart, or a pound (or two) because those are the units of measure that so many of us end up with after a trip to the green market, grocery store, or farm share pick-up.

Instead of giving away your excess produce, or worse, tossing on the compost pile, you can preserve it. Make pesto from that giant bundle of Thai basil. Cook excess zucchini down into a creamy, garlicky butter. And transform those alien-like heads of kohlrabi into crisp, tasty pickles.

Preserving by the Pint Spring - Food in Jars

Unlike my first book, which was arranged by type of preserve, Preserving by the Pint is set up seasonally. The idea is that you can start at the beginning with Spring and preserve your way through both the year and the book. As someone who did essentially that while writing the book, I can promise, you’ll end up with a delightfully varied assortment of things in your pantry and freezer when that year is up.

Marinated Sugar Snap Peas - Food in Jars

One thing you’ll start to notice about this book is that while all the recipes do preserve the season, they don’t all do it through canning. A generous handful of the recipes are designed for refrigerator storage and yet others are best frozen. I made the storage choices I did in order to create the best finished product possible.

These marinated sugar snap peas, for instances, are a quick pickle because if you were to process them in a boiling water bath canner, all those spritely peas would lose their snap and crunch. Kept in the fridge, they last a respectable amount of time and are far more delicious.

Pizza Sauce - Food in Jars

This quick tomato sauce is one of my very favorite recipes in the book. Most years, I buy a 100 pounds of tomatoes and spend a week preserving them whole or as puree. However, throughout the summer, there are often small deals on cracked or otherwise marred tomatoes at my local market that I hate to pass up.

This sauce makes it possible to spend a dollar or two, invest a little time peeling and cooking, and end up with two half pints of glorious, flavorful pizza sauce from each batch. Because I make four or five batches over the course of the summer, I end up with enough sauce to last all year, but it doesn’t feel like any work at all and costs nearly nothing.

Sweet Pear Caramel - Food in Jars

In writing this book, I also worked hard to come up with recipes that solved problems. I often hear from people that they wish they could can caramel sauces. While this sweet pear caramel doesn’t have the creamy mouthfeel of a batch made with heavy cream, it’s a really delicious sauce that can be used in place of traditional caramel drizzles (and if you don’t like pears, try it with peach or raspberry puree).

Preserving by the Pint back - Food in Jars

I am really proud of how this book turned out and am so grateful to Running Press for helping me turn an idea into a beautiful, useful thing.

Finally, it’s time for the weekly giveaway to return. I have three signed copies of Preserving by the Pint, liberated from my stash of author copies, to give away. Here’s how to enter:

  1. Leave a comment on this post and tell me what you think about the new book. Or, if you’re not ready to share your thoughts, tell me about your favorite small batch preserving project.
  2. Comments will close at 11:59 pm on Saturday, March 29, 2014. Winners will be chosen at random and will be posted to the blog on Sunday, March 30, 2014.
  3. Giveaway open all.
  4. One comment per person, please. Entries must be left via the comment form on the blog at the bottom of this post.

P.S. The new book has gotten a bit of love from some of my local media outlets. Here’s what the Philly’s Citypaper, Geekadelphia, and Table Matters have to say.