Tag Archives | giveaway

Rye Crepes and Apple Cardamom Compote + Anolon Advanced Umber Crepe Pan Giveaway

overhead crepe scene

One of my resolutions for 2016 is to make more crepes. They work for any meal of the day, disguise leftovers beautifully, and can be made in advance and reheated just before serving. They’re also a great vehicle for all manner of homemade jams, preserves, and compotes. Truly, they’re a dream for home cooks.

Recently, my friends at Anolon asked me to develop a crepe recipe using their Anolon Advanced Umber 9.5-inch Crepe Pan. After doing a bit of playing around, I made these Rye Crepes with Buttery Apple Compote.

rye crepe ingredients

I’ve been making crepes for more than 20 years now and have learned a few things in the process. I find that using a blender eliminates any pesky lumps in the batter. Don’t fear the crepe, if one crumples or tears when you flip it, just do your best and keep moving forward. And finally, it helps to have a good pan (like this one from Anolon).

This particular crepe batter is one of my favorites, as the rye flour keeps it tender, and the minimal amount of sugar means you can use it to wrap both sweet and savory fillings. I’m sure you’ll find a way to make it work for you!

finished apple compote

Thanks to the kind folks at Anolon, I have one of these Anolon Advanced Umber 9.5-inch Crepe Pans to give away. Please use the Rafflecopter widget below to enter!

For more from Anolon and their Holiday Hosting Campaign, make sure to follow them on social media.

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a Rafflecopter giveaway

Giveaway: Old Blue Raw Honey

A giveaway of west coast honey from Old Blue Raw Honey. All the pictures in the post are by Camille Storch.

three small bottles of honey

This week’s giveaway comes to us from Old Blue Raw Honey. Old Blue is a family business, owned and operated by Henry and Camille Storch (you might know Camille from her lovely blog, Wayward Spark. She’s also written a couple of honey-based guest posts for me in the past).

Camille and Henry Storch, and their kids

Henry is a beekeeper and farrier, transporting his bees to different locations up and down the west coast as needs and the seasons demand. In his free time, he collects seed from native plants and interesting garden varieties, and he plays Legos with his kids. He also documents his days with the bees on Instagram.

Camille handles marketing, customer service, and order fulfillment for Old Blue Raw Honey, and is the writer and photographer behind all the Old Blue blog posts. In her free time, she cans seasonal produce (with honey!), and runs the trails around their home in Philomath, Oregon. Her Instagram account is also glorious.

a wide mouth quart jar full of honey

One of the things that makes Old Blue Raw Honey so special is that they offer a wide array of unusual, small-batch varietal honeys from their hives only. They honey is never heated over natural hive temperatures (under 100°F), and is minimally filtered, so it includes pollen, small wax particles, and once in a while, a small bee bit.

close up on bees crawling on a honeycomb

Old Blue Raw Honey is available online, at select shops, and on occasion, directly from Camille and Henry at events in Oregon. If you’re looking for a good gift for someone who loves interesting honey, getting them a sampler set from Old Blue would be a very smart thing to do.

Happily, it’s the sample set that I get to share today. Henry and Camille have generously offered up three of their Blackberry, Clary Sage, Coriander Honey Sampler Boxes for today’s giveaway. The honeys are packaged in 8 ounce, BPA-free plastic squeeze bottles and I promise, it will take everything you’ve got to keep from dispensing the honey straight onto your tongue.

Here’s how to enter.

  1. Leave a comment on this post and tell me how you like to use honey. Do you spoon it into tea? Drizzle it on cornbread? Dollop a little on a sliver of cheese?
  2. Comments will close at 11:59 pm eastern time on Saturday, December 19, 2015. A winner will be chosen at random and will be posted to the blog on Sunday, December 20, 2015.
  3. Giveaway open to United States residents only. Void where prohibited.
  4. One comment per person, please. Entries must be left via the comment form on the blog at the bottom of this post.

Disclosure: Old Blue Raw Honey is providing the honey for this giveaway at no cost to me. They have not paid for placement (though about a year and a half ago, Camille did give me a little bottle of honey). I’m writing this post because their honey is delicious and I want to share its goodness. 

Winter Squash Risotto with Leeks and Greens + Lagostina Risotto Pot Giveaway

Risotto Set-up - Food in Jars

I have a weakness for beautiful cookware (some woman collect jewelry, I surround myself pots and pans). The first time I saw the Lagostina Risotto Pot at my local Williams-Sonoma, I nearly swooned. Gleaming tri-ply stainless steel! A wooden topped lid (that fits tightly and doubles as a trivet)! And a thick, heat diffusing base to prevent hot spots and burning!

squash for roasting - Food in Jars

To my very great delight, not long after spotting this gorgeous pot for the first time, I got an email asking if I might like one to use for the development of a risotto recipe. I sent a positive response off as quickly as my fingers could type.

pouring rice - Food in Jars

Since this lovely piece of cookware arrived, I’ve been making a lot of risotto. It’s one of my favorite things to make and eat on chilly days. I love the ceremony of near-constant cooking (though to be truthful, I often put the spoon down for a moment or two so that I can do a little clean-up while I cook) and the comfort that comes when you cozy up to a bowlful.

finished risotto - Food in Jars

Whenever I make risotto, my primary goal is to cram as much vegetable content into the pot. Risotto can be a heavy dish, and so making sure that it’s packed with fresh produce (in this case, aromatics, greens, and roasted squash) helps lighten it and make it a more regular dinnertime occurrence.

plated risotto - Food in Jars

When I make this for me (if I’m making if for Scott, I use roasted carrots in place of squash), I peel and chop all the squash and stir it into the rice. However, if I have friends coming by, I like to reserve some of the roasted squash to serve on top. It brings a little visual and textural interest to the plate and makes it feel like something you might be served as the neighborhood Italian place.

risotto pot - Food in Jars

What’s nice about this piece of cookware is that truly, it’s good for so much more than risotto. The wide base and low profile mean that it’s a great shape for any dish you want to simmer and reduce. It does good work with small batches of jam and I love using to make Marcella’s tomato sauce.

The Lagostina Risotto pot can be found at Williams-Sonoma, Bed, Bath, and Beyond, and other specialty shops, and retails for $199.95. For more information about Lagostina, check out their social accounts and visit their website.

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Thanks to the kind folks at Lagostina, I have one of their glorious Risotto Pots to give away to you guys. Here’s how to enter.

  1. Leave a comment on this post and tell me what kind of risotto you’d make in this pot.
  2. Comments will close at 11:59 pm eastern time on Saturday, December 19, 2015. A winner will be chosen at random and will be posted to the blog on Sunday, December 20, 2015.
  3. Giveaway open to United States residents only. Void where prohibited.
  4. One comment per person, please. Entries must be left via the comment form on the blog at the bottom of this post.

Disclosure: Lagostina sent me this risotto pot to use and write about. No additional compensation was provided. All opinions expressed are entirely my own. 

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Giveaway: The Mason Tap Kit

Mason Tap Kit - Food in Jars

One of the things that started my preoccupation with canning jars, lo those many years ago, was their versatility. You could store just about anything in them, they could be a drinking glass or an inexpensive travel mug, and they allowed you to forgo specialty kitchenware for a more one-size-fits-all alternative.

Mason Tap Infuse - Food in Jars

However, back in those early days, even I was forced to admit that there were some things that a mason jar didn’t do well. Top of that list was pour. Sure, you could shake up a salad dressing in a pint jar and take it with you to a potluck, but when it came time to dispense that vinaigrette, you knew a mess was in store. Same went for batches of simple syrup or infused olive oil.

Mason Tap Kit Art - Food in Jars

Enter the Mason Tap. There is nothing better when it comes to dispensing and drizzling from jar to plate, cup or bowl. I have one on a small jar of fancy olive oil and another on my meyer lemon infused vinegar. My mom uses one on her dish soap and my sister keeps one on her homemade vinaigrette. It’s also a great item for avid home cocktail makers, as it puts your infused spirits within easy reach.

Mason Tap Kit Close - Food in Jars

Thanks to the lovely folks at W&P Design (makers of the Mason Tap and the Mason Shaker), I have one of these Mason Tap Kits to give away this week. Here’s how to enter.

  1. Leave a comment on this post and tell me how you’d use the Mason Tap Kit! If you’re stumped for ideas, there are plenty in their book, Infuse.
  2. Comments will close at 11:59 pm eastern time on Saturday, December 12, 2015. A winner will be chosen at random and will be posted to the blog on Sunday, December 13, 2015.
  3. Giveaway open to United States and Canadian residents. Void where prohibited.
  4. One comment per person, please. Entries must be left via the comment form on the blog at the bottom of this post.

Disclosure: The folks at W&P Design provided the kit you see pictured above for review and photography purposes as well as a second one for review, both at no cost to me. However, no additional funds were exchanged and the opinions expressed here are entirely my own. 

Giveaway: The Classic Fermenting Set from FARMcurious

FarmCurious Kit - Food in Jars

Over the last couple years, I’ve fallen hard for fermentation. This time of year, I regularly have jars of cabbage, carrot slices, or cauliflower quietly bubbling away on my counter. And though my first food preservation love will forever be jam making, making pickles with nothing but veg, salt, and a week or so never fails to feel like delightful magic.

FarmCurious Kit Contents - Food in Jars

In the beginning of my fermentation experiments, I didn’t have any dedicated airlocks or specialized weights. And generally, my ferments turned out just fine. Thing is, particularly in the case of sauerkraut, I found that I always had to toss the upper half-inch of cabbage, because it was brown, dried out, or even worse, a little slimy and moldy. However, when I started adding airlocks and weights to my process, I noticed that whole product stayed good.

FarmCurious airlocks - Food in Jars

One such airlock set-up I like a lot is the set from FARMcurious. It combines the pour spout lids from reCAP with a specially sized stopper that fits the spout in the lid and the stem of the airlock. You fill up a wide mouth jar with your prepared produce and salt (or brine), settle a weight on top (if you’re using one), and twist on the FARMcurious airlock system. A little water in the airlock and you’re good to go!

Inside FarmCurious Kit - Food in Jars

I know you’re getting gift giving messages from all sides right now, but if someone you love wants to get started fermenting in the new year, either the classic FARMcurious Fermenting Set (that’s the one pictured here) or their Ultimate Fermenting Kit (in addition to the lids, airlocks and stoppers included in the classic set, this kit also includes weights and a copy of the fabulous book Fermented Vegetables, prettily packaged in a gift box).

FarmCurious on Jar - Food in Jars

The good folks at FARMcurious want to share the fermenting love and so are offering up one of their classic Fermenting Sets. They also want you to know that they’re not just an online shop. They offer a world of resources for the home fermenter, including an extensive archive of fermentation support and FAQ and lots of recipes to help you incorporate your ferments into your daily meal prep. Make sure to follow them on social media for more tips, tricks, and promotions. They even run a Facebook community for users of the FARMcurious fermenting set.

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Oh, and just one more thing. If you like what you see on the FARMcurious shop page, make sure to use the code “foodinjars” for 10% off your purchase. Now, on to the giveaway!

  1. Leave a comment on this post and tell me something about your fermenting habit. Have you tried it? Or are you still curiously reading up on the subject? Did you have a project go spectacularly right or wrong?
  2. Comments will close at 11:59 pm eastern time on Sunday, December 6, 2015. Winners will be chosen at random and will be posted to the blog on Monday, December 7, 2015.
  3. Giveaway open to United States residents only. Void where prohibited.
  4. One comment per person, please. Entries must be left via the comment form on the blog at the bottom of this post.

Disclosure: The folks at FARMcurious sent me the set you see here for review and photography purposes at no cost to me. No additional compensation was provided. All opinions remain my own.  

Giveaway: Yogotherm from Hobby Hill Farm Fresh

yogotherm box - Food in Jars

I’ve been making yogurt at home off and on for years. I started doing it because I was trying to reduce the amount of plastic that was coming into my kitchen and all those quart tubs seemed like a good place to start. I kept doing it because I found that it was easy, immensely satisfying, budget friendly, and produced delicious yogurt. I often suggest homemade yogurt to friends and blog readers who are looking for an easy and satisfying homemade dairy project.

yogotherm canister - Food in Jars

For years now, my favorite method for keeping the yogurt warm during the culturing stage was to use a cooler. However, it was also the cooler that often deterred me from making yogurt. In my apartment, the only space large enough for a cooler is up at the top of my hall closet. To pull it out or put it away again involves a step stool and the momentary relocation of the things living in front of it. Sad to say, but dread of playing tetris with my storage area was often

heating milk - Food in Jars

Thankfully, Sharon from Hobby Hill Farm Fresh came to my rescue, with the suggestion of the Yogotherm. It’s a product she uses in many of her classes, and has been the solution to my previous yogurt making resistance. The design is simple. It’s a food-safe plastic tub, nestled into an insulated canister.

You can either pour your heated and inoculated milk into a jar and set it into the Yogotherm, or you can pour it directly into the tub. The canister keeps the milk at the ideal temperature for the culture to take hold and transform the milk into yogurt.

cooling milk - Food in Jars

I’ve been making one quart at a time in my Yogotherm. I slowly warm four cups of organic whole milk to 180 degrees F. Once the milk reaches that temperature, I either set the pot into a sink full of cold water or (if I’ve used a pot that doesn’t handle radical temperature changes well), I pour the warm milk into a stainless steel bowl and let it cool for a moment or two. I’ve found that brisk whisking while the milk is cooling brings the temperature down quickly. Just make sure to watch the temperature so that it doesn’t cool too much.

inoculated milk - Food in Jars

Once the milk is around 120 degrees F, pull it out of the cold water and whisk in the culture. For my first batch, I used the yogurt culture that Sharon sent along with the Yogotherm. For subsequent batches, I’ve saved a few tablespoons of the yogurt from the previous batch to act as the starter for the next.

culturing yogurt - Food in Jars

Then I give the Yogotherm a quick rinse with boiling water to warm and clean it, nestle my jar into the canister (the container is made of food-safe plastic, I just like the ease of being able to pull the jar right out and pop it in the fridge when the yogurt is done), and pop the lid on. Because I like a tangy yogurt, I let it culture for five to eight hours, but for a less tart version, you can stop the culturing as soon as the milk thickens.

This week, Hobby Hill Farm Fresh is offering a special deal on the Yogotherm. It’s on sale for $46.95 (down from $57.95) and will ship with packets of two different yogurt cultures and a jar of their house brand preserves. Additionally, I have one Yogotherm pack (same as what you’d get if you bought it) to give away this week.

  1. Leave a comment on this post and tell me about your gateway DIY project. Yogurt making? Bread baking? Canning? Or something else?
  2. Comments will close at 11:59 pm eastern time on Saturday, November 28, 2015. Winners will be chosen at random and will be posted to the blog on Sunday, November 29, 2015.
  3. Giveaway open to United States residents only. Void where prohibited.
  4. One comment per person, please. Entries must be left via the comment form on the blog at the bottom of this post.

Disclosure: Sent me the Yogotherm you see here, as well as a few yogurt cultures, for review and photography purposes at no cost to me. No additional compensation was provided. All opinions remain my own.