Tag Archives | food in jars

Photos From the Food in Jars Flickr Pool

I’m bringing back the habit of featuring photos from the Food in Jars Flickr group on Sunday evenings. Here are a few pretties from the last few weeks. If you’d like to see your photo featured in this site, please head over to Flickr, join the group and start adding your images.

1823 canned goodies

An assortment of homemade goodness that Karen made last season, posted as inspiration for this canning season. She blogs at Short Story Long.

Black Raspberry Sage Jam

Candy’s black raspberry sage jam. She blogs at Dessert by Candy.

ginger peach jam & peach lavender butter

Gorgeous ginger peach jam and lavender peach butter from Gypsy Forest. Find her blog here.

Honey Strawberry Jam

Aimee’s strawberry jam with honey. Find the recipe over here at Simple Bites.

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Homemade pickles from Michelle who blogs at Give a Girl a Fig.

Blackberry Syrup

And finally, some blackberry syrup that Wendi made. Check out all her lovely preserving posts at Bon Appetit Hon.

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Books, Press, Conferences and More

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When I was 13 years old, I decided that I wanted to become a public speaker when I grew up (yes, I do realize that that’s sort of an odd thing for a freshly minted teenager to choose). The only problem was that I didn’t know what it was that I wanted to talk about. So I let that dream go quiet, not giving up on it exactly, but letting it slip to the background as I went to school, moved across the country, worked and generally lived my life.

It’s funny how things work out though, because in the process of living, I found my niche and became someone who publicly writes, teaches and talks about canning and home food preservation. The 13 year old version of me would be pretty incredulous, but the 31 year old version couldn’t be happier with the way things are working out.

To that end, I thought it was time to share with you some good news (though if you spotted the article the Daily News article in which I was featured, you’ve already got the scoop). I’m writing a cookbook. It will be called Food in Jars (just like this website) and will include 100 recipes that will cover jams, pickles, fruit butters, tomato products, granolas and bread mixes. The book will be published by Running Press and will be coming out in the spring of 2012. As you might guess, I am thrilled.

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In other fun news, the BlogHer Food agenda was published last week and I’m excited to say that I’ll be speaking in the session entitled The Old-School Arts: Canning, Preserving, Foraging. My fellow Philly-based preserver Audra Wolfe (aka Doris the Goat) will also be up there with me and Sean Timberlake (who just launched the fabulous Punk Domestics site) will be moderating the session.

And now, in other preserving news, I’ve recently learned that the Mother Earth News Fair is taking place the weekend of September 25-26 just outside of Pittsburgh, PA and has a huge focus on canning, preserving, fermentation, cheese-making, baking, beer brewing and other kitchen arts. Unfortunately, I’ve already got plans that weekend, so I can’t go. However, for those of you who live within a doable drive of that area, I think you should consider attending. It sounds amazing (Sherri Brooks Vinton, the author of Put ‘Em Up! will be there) and the tickets are really affordable. A one-day pass is $15 and a weekend pass is $25. Kids 17 years and under are free.

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Facebook, Twitter + Waffles

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Many months ago, I set up a Facebook fan page for this blog. You see, I do some social media stuff for my day job and so figured that if I was learning about it for work, it might be a good idea to also apply that information to the project that fills my free time. But then, life intervened (as it so often does) and I let that fan page lay fallow. Or so I thought.

Last weekend, I was prompted by a comment on the blog, asking me if I wouldn’t please post notifications on the fan page when I published a new post, to take another look. I was startled to discover that my empty little page had a number of wall comments and more than 50 fans. So I decided to dust it off, get a a snazzy URL (www.facebook.com/FoodinJars) and pay attention to that space. So, if you happen to be a Facebook-minded person, feel free to head over there and become a fan of Food in Jars. I’ll make a point of checking in daily to answer questions and post blog updates.

If you’re more of a Twitter person, I’ve also started using the account (@foodinjars) I created lo those many months ago, to send new post notifications. Click here to get to that account. My personal Twitter handle is @marusula* and if you’re so inclined, you can follow that account as well.

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top view

This blog regularly gives me the opportunity to put my jar obsession on public display. Thing is, I actually do have other culinary preoccupations. Case in point? My waffle iron collection. However, thanks to Dan at Waffleizer (one of my new favorite blogs), I’ve been given a chance to put my waffle irons on display.

Sadly, these days, I have but three. In past years, the number crept up as far as five (I’ve been known to give them away, when I find a waffle aficionado who I know will put the iron to good use). To see the full set of waffle iron photos I took that day, click here. If you suddenly find yourself struck with a waffle craving, this pancake mix also makes a mean waffle. I think I might make a batch of these waffled hash browns to go with. Just because I can.

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*Marusula is a nickname my sister gave me years ago and somehow, it’s become my handle for most social media things. Had I known how identified we would become with these handles, I might have chosen something slightly more dignified. But it’s too late to change now. And really, that’s okay.

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Holiday Wishes

my mother's jars

I’m a few days behind in wishing you all a very happy holiday season (I’ve spent very little time in front a computer while out here in Portland. It’s been a much needed break), but wanted to send my message of love, appreciation and joyful times out, no matter the belatedness. I hope that your holiday (whether you celebrate Hanukkah, solstice, Christmas or Kwanzaa) was chock full of family, fun and, yes, food in jars.

(Those shelves you see up there? That’s my mom’s assortment of nuts and grains. It certainly gives you an idea of where I got the jar bug.)

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Beer in Jars + Jars on Blogs

beer in jar

Last night, Scott and I had headed down to Headhouse Square for the fifth annual Good Food, Good Beer evening. It’s a fundraiser for our local Slow Food organization and it’s the third year in a row that we’ve attended. It’s a fun event, because you get to taste five different small plates from local restaurants and drink a whole bunch of beer (nicer for me than for Scott, as he’s not a beer guy) for $32 (no worse than what you’d pay for any other night out).

I made a point to bring my own glass, because otherwise, I end up tossing a whole bunch of plastic tasting cups. And, because it’s me, my to-go glass was actually the wide-mouth pint jar you see above (pint jars also work nicely as a reusable cup for iced coffee. Just sayin’). I feel refreshed just looking at it!

And on to the jars on blogs…

Cherry tomato jam (as well as a nod at canteloupe jam, but no recipe. I’m intrigued!).

Canning apricots and cherries (although not in the same jar).

Hello cajun pickles! Oh, and three takes on the same pickle brine.

Pickled zucchini. Pickled radishes. Pickled bing cherries.

Apricot compote with Scotch whisky. I am dazzled.

I used my mint syrup to make a quart-sized mojito last Friday night. Here are a couple more homemade cocktail syrups.

And a couple of canning safety questions. Re-nest looks into whether there’s BPA in your home canned goods and Rebekah Denn ponders the safety of home canning.

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Foods in jars at the Fancy Food Show

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I took the day off from work on Monday in order to head up to New York for a day of the Fancy Food Show. Last summer, I went for two and a half days, but this year, since I’m not writing for a general interest food site at the moment, I decided to just spend a single day wandering the show floor. I had a good time, tasting and chatting, but the whole time I was there, I kept feeling like I didn’t quite belong.

As I looked at all the available products, I realized how little I’m interested in promoting things for people to buy (despite all the wonderful things available out there in the world). I’m far more interested in encouraging people to shop their farmers market, plant a garden and make their jams, spread, pickles and condiments on their own. However, the show was great in that it planted many seeds in my canning brain, that are now germinating and growing into recipes. Here are some of the best examples of foods in jars that I saw, maybe they’ll help inspire some of you as well!

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This Black Olive with Ginger Jam was amazing – sweet, sharp and poignant in the very same bite.

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These were some of the best pickled veggies I’ve ever tasted, they manage to be crisp, bright and shelf stable. As some of you might know, when you can pickled vegetables, it can be a challenge to keep them crunchy and safe for storage at the same time. This company has figured out a magic solution (when I pressed them about their process, they clammed up).

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Carrot jam? Carrot jam! As far as I could tell, this was shredded carrots, cooked with sugar, spices and a bit of vinegar. It’s going on my list of things I’d like to do someday.

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These port wine and fruit jams were just lovely. Sweet and rich, the port wasn’t overpowered, but was definitely there. They’d be excellent with cheese (and wouldn’t be hard to make at home).

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Actually, here’s one product that I do love, that you can’t really make at home. Organic peanut butter from the folks who bring you Cream Nut (the most delicious and expensive peanut butter around). This one might be worth buying (probably only as a special treat though, it is quite pricey).

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