Tag Archives | Figs

Fig Meyer Lemon Marmalade Recipe

This Fig Meyer Lemon Marmalade is a flavor combination made possible by California Figs and Lemon Ladies Orchard. While this isn’t a sponsored post, all the fruit was given to me by west coast friends.

Two stacked jars of fig meyer lemon marmalade

Back in early September, the folks from California Figs sent me some figs. And when I say some figs, I don’t mean they just sent a few. They sent me an abundance of figs. A delightment of figs. A true embarrassment of fig riches.

Sliced meyer lemons soaking in a bowl of water for fig meyer lemon marmalade

I took some to a friend’s party that was happening that very night. I packed up some and brought them with me to the Omega Institute for my weekend long canning workshop (we turned them into this Chunky Fig Jam). When I got back, I simmered and pureed a bunch into a version of the Gingery Fig Butter from my Naturally Sweet Food in Jars book (I used vanilla bean rather than ginger).

Sugared figs for fig meyer lemon marmalade

The remaining portion because this Fig Meyer Lemon Marmalade. Around the same time that these figs arrived, my friend Karen (owner of the Lemon Ladies Orchard) sent me a handful of late season lemons as encouragement to get well (I’d had a rotten cold and a bout of the flu in rapid succession).

Sliced lemons and figs ready to become fig meyer lemon marmalade

After making myself a series of bracing honey and lemon drinks to combat my various ailments, I had enough lemons to make this preserve. Much like the sweet cherry version I made earlier in the season, I approached this recipe over the course of a couple of days.

Finished fig meyer lemon marmalade in the pan

I sliced, deseeded, and soaked the lemons overnight at room temperature. I also quartered the figs, mixed them with sugar and let them macerate overnight in the fridge (it was still hot then and I didn’t want them to turn boozy while I slept).

Six jars of fig meyer lemon marmalade

The next day, I combined the soaked lemons (and their water), the figs, and the sugar and brought it to a rapid, rolling boil. After about 35 minutes of cooking and stirring, the marmalade was sheeting off the spoon nicely and was approaching the critical 220F.

Close-up of jars of fig meyer lemon marmalade

In the end, I was left with six half pints of marmalade that marries the qualities of the two fruits beautifully. The fig flavor sings and the lemons bring more than enough acid to supplement the figs lower levels. This is one that I am only sharing with my very favorite people and I’m doing my best to hold onto at least two jars (I tend to be quite generous with my preserves).

Should you find yourself with similar sets of ingredients (this may only be possible if you live in California), I highly encourage you to try a batch.

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Other People’s Preserves: Orchard Choice Fig Spreads from Valley Fig Growers

fig spread cheese plate side

I didn’t preserve a single fig this year and only managed to get my hands on a single one to eat fresh (thankfully, it was perfect). I’m consoling myself both with the knowledge that there is always next year and a recent fig-packed box¬†from the Valley Fig Growers.

four fig spreads

They sent a box containing a cooler holding three different kinds of cheeses, a little slate and cheese spreader, and four jars from their new line of Orchard Choice Fig Spreads. These fig spreads are made from fig puree, sugar, pectin, and additions like balsamic vinegar, port wine, or orange zest.

fig spread top

Designed to complement cheeses, cured meats, and other savory bites, these fig spreads are a welcome addition to my pantry, which was entirely vacant of any thing fig-based until this box arrived.

I’ve opened up the Organic Mission Fig variety so far, and will be trotting out the other jars for various holiday parties and baking projects (I have a feeling the Port Wine version would go beautifully in these blue cheese thumbprint cookies).

fig spread with brie

For more ideas on how to use both fresh and dried figs and these fig spreads, follow Valley Fig on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram!

Disclosure: The nice folks at Valley Fig Growers sent the cheese care package described above and asked that I write about it if I enjoyed the spreads. No additional compensation was provided for this post. It’s simply part of my ongoing mission to help spread the preserved food love!

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Small Batch Strawberry Fig Jam

figs and strawberries

A couple weeks back, I went to a dinner hosted by California Figs. At the end of the dinner, when I was absolutely full to the bursting point, the nice folks who had organized the dinner handed me a little colander of fresh figs to take home. Though I couldn’t quite imagine ever eating again, I said yes to the figs and walked home with them perched carefully in my purse.

black figs

It was a busy weekend and so the figs languished in the fridge for two whole days. It wasn’t until Sunday night (the dinner had been on Thursday) that I was able to take stock and determine what was on the verge of going bad.

a scant quart of strawberries

There was a bundle of basil that became walnut pesto. A bundle of kale was chopped and toasted into chips. At last, I was down to figs and a scant quart of rapidly softening strawberries from our Saturday CSA pick-up.

chopped fruit

Though I’d never had strawberry fig jam, I was fairly certain it could be done (and a quick internet search showed that I was not nearly the first to combine these two). And so I chopped the fruit, weighed it and added half as much sugar. It all went into a jar and then into the fridge for an overnight rest.

cooking

Two days later, I circled back around to the jar. What I found was glorious. The strawberries and figs had mellowed and married. I scraped the contents of the jar into a skillet, added a little lemon juice and cooked it, stirring all the while, until I could draw a path through the jam with my spatula.

finished strawberry fig jam

I ended up with just enough to fill three half pint jars, which I processed in my 4th burner pot. I sent one jar to my dad for Father’s Day, gave another to a friend as a thank you and am saving the final jar for late fall, when both fresh strawberries and figs are just a memory.

a half pint of strawberry fig jam

A note: Do remember that figs are among that group of fruits that are a bit low on acid for safe boiling water bath preserving. Any time you work with them, it’s important to either combine them with higher acid fruits or to add some lemon juice in order to boost the acid levels. As you can see, I’ve done both here to ensure a perfectly safe product.

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