Giveaway: EcoJarz Jar Hugger Handle and Green Pop Top

Ecojarz Giveaway

I’ve got a good giveaway for you this week! Our friends at EcoJarz are on a quest to make it ever more convenient to use mason jars a travel mugs and this pairing may well take the cake on that front. They’ve created a cozy called the JarHugger Handle made of recycled denim that has a large, sturdy loop built in for easy gripping.

Coupled with their sealable silicone Pop Top, this is accessory duo will have you ready for portable coffee, smoothies, and iced tea drinking.

This week, I have three of these cozy and topper sets to give away. Here’s how to enter.

  1. Leave a comment on this post share one thing you’re looking forward to about spring!
  2. Comments will close at 11:59 pm east coast time on Saturday, March 14, 2015. The winner will be chosen at random and will be posted to the blog by Sunday, March 15, 2015.
  3. Giveaway is open to US residents and Canadian residents.
  4. One comment per person, please. Entries must be left on the blog, I cannot accept submissions via email.

Disclosure: EcoJarz is providing the cozies and pop tops for this giveaway. They have not paid for promotion and at the time of this writing, are not current Food in Jars sponsors. All thoughts and opinions are entirely my own. 

 

Upcoming Classes: Philadelphia Free Library & Morris Arboretum

class image revised

Slowly but surely, my summer teaching schedule is shaping up. I’m not going to be doing as much teaching or traveling this year as I did last, but I’m committed to offering an array of classes in the Philadelphia area and beyond. There are a couple of classes I want to point out right now, as I think both of these offerings are going to fill up fast and I want you to know about them.

The first is a sauerkraut workshop next Monday, March 16 from 6-8 pm at the Free Library of Philadelphia’s Culinary Literacy Center. In this workshop, I’ll show you how to make a basic sauerkraut using my single quart technique. We’ll talk easy fermentation and I’ll share some of my favorite ways to use homemade kraut once you’ve got it. The class costs just $10 and you can sign up here.

The other class I want to make sure you all know about is my annual spring preserving workshop at the Morris Arboretum’s Bloomfield Farm on Saturday, May 16 from 10 am to 12 noon. I’ll be teaching about low sugar preserving using Pomona’s Pectin. This class a great way to refresh your canning knowledge for the coming season. It costs $40 for Arboretum members and $45 for non-members. Register here.

The rest of my confirmed classes can be found here. If you want me to come and teach a class for your church group, home schooling co-op or other gathering (preferably within an hour’s drive of Philadelphia), I am open to inquiries. Drop me a note here.

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Links: Repurposed Ferments, Pancakes, and Winners

kumquats

Despite the loss of the hour this morning, today was sort of glorious. The sun was shining, the temperature hovered well above freezing, I wrote a third post for a silly little side blog I’ve started, and I spent a couple hours in a coffee shop working on the new book (it’s finally starting to come together. Thank goodness). Now, links!

fresh herb keeper

The winners of the herb savers are #137/Laura H. and #264/Elin . Stay tuned, another fun giveaway coming tomorrow!

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Other People’s Preserves: Omnivore Sauce from Garibaldi Goods

Omnivore Sauce

Other People’s Preserve is my opportunity to shine a spotlight on some of the very delicious jams, pickles, and condiments being made by dedicated professionals. If you see one of these products out in the wild, consider picking up a jar, tub, or bottle!

This week, I have a fun product to share with you. Called Omnivore Sauce (from the makers of Omnivore Salt!), this is a condiment that defies traditional definitions. Made from a roster of organic ingredients, including tomatoes, olive oil, balsamic vinegar, ancho chiles and other spices, this tangy, spicy, and slightly sweet sauce can dress up just about any meal you make.

Omnivore Sauce label

It is runnier than ketchup, but thicker than most barbecue sauces or bottled marinades. I’ve used it as a dipping sauce for roasted root vegetables and spread as a base layer on homemade pizza. The folks at Garibaldi Goods also suggest brushing it over roasted or grilled fish at the end of cooking or stirred it into sautéed onions and garlic for long braised dishes.

open Omnivore Sauce

This post is the second in a series I’m doing with the nice folks at Garibaldi Goods. They’re an online shop that features artisanal, small batch products all made in the fine state of California (place of my birth!). Sign up for their newsletter to get 10% off your first order! Sign up form is at the bottom of the page.

Disclosure: The folks at Garibaldi Goods sent me this jar of Omnivore Sauce for sampling and photography purposes. All thoughts and opinions remain entirely mine. 

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Cookbooks: Against the Grain

Against the Grain cover

I have no beef with gluten. I eat it happily and without any kind of gastrointestinal or autoimmune distress. Nonetheless, I have really enjoyed using some of the gluten-free cookbooks that have been published over the last few years.

The reason for my appreciate is simple. I like new ideas and opportunities to expand beyond my regular set of ingredients and these books are terrific at finding new, delicious ways to make things work.

peanut butter bars

What’s more, while I can eat wheat until the cows come home, lots of people I know cannot. I am always happy to discover novel recipes that I can share with friends and relatives who have to stay away from various grains or anything with gluten.

book and squares

A few weeks back, a copy of Nancy Cain’s Against the Grain appeared in my mailbox. I spent a few minutes flipping through and immediately identified a handful of recipes I wanted to try (Maple Flax Crackers! Cashew Chews with Cacao Nibs! Buckwheat Cheddar Puffs!). Later that night, I had a pan of her Peanut Butter Bars cooling on my counter.

peanut butter cubes

Made with just peanut butter, honey, an egg, baking soda, and a little bit of coconut, you might wonder how on earth these bars work. But work they do, whether you’re on a gluten-free diet or not. I cut them into small squares and ate most of the pan on my own, one or two at a time. They’re naturally sweetened, high in protein, and best when eaten at room temperature. Perfect for snack time or a late night nibble!

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Meyer Lemon Ginger Concentrate

bowl of meyer lemons

I know. This blog has been awfully citrus heavy of late. So much so that it wouldn’t be a stretch to rename things Citrus in Jars (with the occasional fermented vegetable). Yet, here I am again, with more lemons. And not even a project-y marmalade or curd. Just a concentrate.

sliced lemons

Thing is, it’s been something of a brutal winter here in Philadelphia (though not as soul sucking as our friends in New England have had to live through) and I’m still working my way through the citrus recipes for the natural sweeteners book. I just don’t have a whole lot of creativity left. And so I return to the things I know and love.

simmering lemon syrup

And these citrus-based concentrates? I LOVE them because they are delicious and versatile. You can use them to sweeten your fizzy water (I know I suggest this a lot, but as someone who drinks many quart jars of water a day, it makes for a nice occasional treat). They work well in cocktails. And I’ve yet to meet a poundcake that appreciate a few drizzles of flavored syrup.

What’s more, next time you want to make a pitcher of lemonade, you can just pop open a jar, dilute it with water, ice it down, and serve.

grated ginger

I used Meyer lemons in this batch, but if those feel too dear, just use plain old grocery store lemons. It will be a little bit more tart, but you can always temper that by adding the juice of one orange to the mix.

Another place where you might want to make a switch is in sweetener. I used evaporated cane juice, but one could just as easily go with honey. Just use about a third less if you make that swap.

Finally, let’s talk ginger. I grated a huge hunk of ginger on a microplane until I had 1/4 cup of pulp. If the lemon ginger combo isn’t your thing, you could also try some lavender, cardamom, or even a little cayenne if you want a spicy kick. Just strain the syrup through a tightly woven sieve before canning.

finished lemon ginger concentrate

One last thing. If you don’t choose to zest your lemons for a salt blend before squeezing, make sure to heap the into a jar and cover them with white vinegar. Let them steep for a couple of days and then strain out all the spent lemon rinds. They will have given their essence to the vinegar and it will make for a very lovely cleaning fluid. I use it as a countertop spray and it cuts through the grease like you wouldn’t believe.

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