Cookbooks: Beyond Canning by Autumn Giles

Beyond Canning Cover - Food in Jars

Autumn Giles and I first met nearly six years ago. It was at a canning party in Kate Payne’s Brooklyn apartment on a hot, August morning, where we chopped, trimmed, pitted, and canned our way through nearly 100 pounds of produce.

She was a beginning canner in those days, but as you can see from her new book, Beyond Canning: New Techniques, Ingredients, and Flavors to Preserve, Pickle, and Ferment Like Never Before, she has become an expert preserver in the intervening years!

Beyond Canning Back - Food in Jars

The recipes in this book are divided up into three sections. You’ll find the Sweet Preserves first. That chapter includes appealing things like Tomato-Vanilla Jam, Hibiscus-Lime Jelly, Banana-Chocolate Butter, and Fig Jam with Toasted Fennel Seeds. I particularly like how Autumn makes good use of chiles and spices to add interest and flavor to familiar fruits.

Beyond Canning Jar Diagram - Food in Jars

Next comes the Pickles. This section positively vibrates with creativity and I want to make every single thing in it. Recipes that are particular stand-outs in my mind are the Broiled Pickled Onions (I love the idea of a little char in a pickle), the Maple Plum Mostarda (it’s made with mustard seeds rather than the oil, so that the ingredients are accessible for all makers), and the Green Chile Jam (I want to dollop some on eggs immediately).

Beyond Canning Smooth Cherry Limeade Jam - Food in Jars

The third section digs into various acts of Fermentation. You’ll find Dilly Beans (a long-time favorite), White Kimchi, Gochugaru Preserved Lemons, Chow-Chow Kraut, and so much more. If you’ve not yet dipped a toe into the fermentation pool, I promise, Autumn’s clear and confident instructions will help you get started without fear.

Beyond Canning Apple Chutney - Food in Jars

Beyond Canning has been out for a few weeks now, but today marks the start of the its online book tour and I am delighted to be kicking things off! If you like what you see here, make sure to check out the rest of the sites who will be writing about this lovely book in the coming days.

3/7: Food in Jars
3/8: Punk Domestics
3/9: CakeWalk
3/10: Hip Girl’s Guide to Homemaking
3/11: Snowflake Kitchen
3/14: Good. Food. Stories.
3/15: Heartbeet Kitchen
3/16: Brooklyn Supper
3/17: The Briny
3/18: The Preserved Life
3/21: Hitchhiking to Heaven
3/22: Hola Jalapeno
3/23: Cook Like a Champion
3/24:  Local Kitchen

Beyond Canning Lemony Sprouts KrautChi - Food in Jars

I have one copy of this fabulous book to give away this week. Here’s how to enter.

  1. Leave a comment on this post and share something that’s been sparking your culinary creativity in recent days.
  2. Comments will close at 11:59 pm eastern time on Saturday, March 12, 2016. A winner will be chosen at random and will be posted to the blog on Sunday, March 13, 2016.
  3. Giveaway open to United States and Canadian residents. Void where prohibited.
  4. One comment per person, please. Entries must be left via the comment form on the blog at the bottom of this post.

Beyond Canning Rose Wine Jelly - Food in Jars

I have one more treat from this book for you. Autumn and her publisher have given me permission to reprint the Rose Wine Jelly recipe. I’ll confess, I’ve not had the chance to make it yet, but I LOVE the idea of it and plan on turning to her formula the next time I have a bit of wine leftover from the bottle. That recipe is after the jump, so make sure to click through and give it a read!

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All-Clad NS1 Nonstick Induction Stock Pot + Roasted Tomato and Basil Soup

Finished Tomato Soup - Food in Jars

Back in the Fall, I did a little project with the folks at All-Clad, in which they sent me the NS1 Chef’s Pan from their their new line of NS1 Nonstick Induction cookware and I used it to make a batch of really delicious (and totally vegan, to boot) batch of Kabocha Squash, Coconut, and Wild Rice Stew.

It was a fun project, because it made think outside of my normal patterns, and I got to play with a really fabulous pan (that Chef’s Pan has become my go-to for batches of homemade fried rice. It’s a dream). So, when they got in touch again back in early February and asked if I might want to do it again, this time with their NS1 Stock Pot, I said sure.

All-Clad Stock Pot top - Food in Jars

Just to refresh our memories, this line of All-Clad is made from anodized aluminum, has a sturdy three-layer PFOA-free nonstick interior, and is induction-compatible thanks to steel base that also helps prevent warping. The stock pot has relatively narrow base and tall sides, which makes it ideal for making stock, soup, simmering beans, or even poaching whole chickens (something people just don’t do enough).

You could even drop a blossom trivet in the bottom and use it as a medium-sized canning pot. Currently, the NS1 Nonstick Induction line is available exclusively at Williams-Sonoma and this stock pot sells for $179.95.

All-Clad Stock Pot - Food in Jars

I’ve had this pot in my kitchen for about three weeks now and have come to appreciate its form and function a great deal. Every other stock pot I own holds 12 quarts or more, which means that when I make stock, I can’t help but make a lot (I know I could fill up the pot less, but that just never seems to happen).

tomatoes for roasting - Food in Jars

Having a sturdy stock pot that holds a third less that my other pots means that I end up making a more reasonable volume of stock, which is nice. The high sides do an excellent job of preventing excessive evaporation. And the durable non-stick surface makes for really easy clean-up. This particular pot has become a piece of cookware that I didn’t know I needed, but am now very grateful to have!

Roasted Tomatoes - Food in Jars

In choosing a recipe to devise in this pot, I turned to my pantry. There was a moment when I considered making a big batch of brothy white beans, flavored with rosemary and parmesan rind. Then I considered doing a pasta and potato concoction, a la Rachel Roddy. Finally, I settled on a big pot of roasted tomato and basil soup.

Cooking Tomato Soup - Food in Jars

I’ve been making variations on this soup for years now, always using Ina Garten’s recipe as a starting place. However, it’s become a particular favorite in recent years because it makes good use of two of my favorite tomato preserves — these slow roasted tomatoes and my whole peeled canned tomatoes.

Roasted Tomato Basil Soup - Food in Jars

I know that it’s traditional to serve tomato soup with grilled cheese sandwiches, but I tend to prefer an open-face sandwich and so opt for cheesy toast instead. However you serve it, it’s delicious!

Disclosure: All-Clad sent me the pan you see pictured above at no cost to me. No additional compensation was provided.

For more about these fabulous pans, follow All-Clad and Williams-Sonoma on social media!
All-Clad: Facebook | Twitter | Pinterest | Instagram
Williams-Sonoma: Facebook | Twitter | Pinterest | Instagram

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March Sponsors: Cuppow! Fillmore Container! Hobby Hill Farm Farm! Mason Jar Lifestyle!

four cuppow lids - Food in Jars

Friends! Let’s welcome the arrival of March with a big old thanks to the companies who sponsor this site and help make it possible for me to keep writing witty and fact-filled blog posts for your enjoyment.

In the top spot is our friends at Cuppow are back in the top spot once again. They are the creator of the original mason jar travel mug topper and the BNTO, a small plastic cup that transforms a canning jar into a snack or lunch box. I’m giving away six sets of lids and BNTOs this week, so don’t forget to enter!

Next up are the lovely people at Fillmore Container. They are a family-owned business based in Lancaster, PA that sells all manner of canning jars, lids, and other preservation gear. I have a really great giveaway coming up from them later this month, so stay tuned for that!

Hobby Hill Farm is with us this month. Based in Powhatan, Virginia, they sell locally made jams and preserves, homemade pretzels, candies, and cheese making kits (including the mozzarella kit I demoed here). Sharon teaches a ton of preserving, cheese making, baking, and pasta making classes, so if you’re in her neck of the woods, make sure to check out her class schedule!

Mason Jar Lifestyle is a one-stop shopping site for all the jar lovers out there! They’ve got silicone drink lids, fruit infusers, silicone jar seals (great for those times when you want to ensure that your jars aren’t going to leak), copper regular mouth lids (fun for gifts!), and even pin cushion toppers. The season for iced drinks is coming, so perhaps a new extra long stainless steel straw is in order (they’re designed to be the perfect size for quart jars).

If your company or small business is interested in becoming a sponsor, you can find more details here. I offer discounts for multiple month purchases and am always happy to work with your budget. Leave a comment on this post or drop me a note to learn more!

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Giveaway: Cuppow Lids and BNTO Adaptors

New BNTO Colors - Food in Jars

Our friends over at Cuppow have been really busy lately. Not only have they added more colors to their line-ups of Cuppow drink lids and BNTO jar lunchbox adaptors, they’ve added the most beautifully packaged laundry powder from The Simply Co. to their shop that I’ve ever seen (it comes in a sturdy, reusable 32 ounce jar!).

New Cuppow Colors - Food in Jars

In case you’re unfamiliar with Cuppow, they are the makers of the original mason jar drink lid adaptor and the inventor of the BNTO, which allows you to transform a mason jar into a two-part food storage (great for picnics and snacks on the go). Whenever I know that I’m going to be away from home for most of the day, I tuck some cut fruit into a jar and pop a BNTO in on top and pour some nuts into it. Nothing better to prevent lousy snacking that being prepared!

BNTO Angle - Food in Jars

The nice folks at Cuppow just sent me a box of their drink lids and BNTOs so that I can share them with you guys. There will be six winners in this giveaway, and each winner will get a Cuppow lid and BNTO. I’ll do my best to make sure everyone gets their preferred colors, but that sort of thing isn’t always possible.

Here’s how to enter.

  1. Leave a comment on this post and tell me how you’d put a Cuppow lid or BNTO into action in your life.
  2. Comments will close at 11:59 pm eastern time on Saturday, March 5, 2016. A winner will be chosen at random and will be posted to the blog on Sunday, March 6, 2016.
  3. Giveaway open to United States and Canadian residents. Void where prohibited.
  4. One comment per person, please. Entries must be left via the comment form on the blog at the bottom of this post.

Disclosure: Cuppow is a Food in Jars sponsor and is providing these giveaway units at no cost to me. However, all opinions expressed here are entirely my own. 

Other People’s Preserves: Lehigh Biltong

Lehigh Bilton - Food in Jars

Other People’s Preserve is my opportunity to shine a spotlight on some of the very delicious jams, pickles, and preserved foods being made by some of the many dedicated professionals out there. If you see one of these products out in the wild, consider picking up a jar, tub, or bottle!

Most of you are probably familiar with jerky, but biltong may be a new one to you. It’s a South African method of drying meat for long term preservation. The meat is seasoned with salt, pepper, vinegar, and coriander and then hung to dry for several days, until it is dry but still pliable.

Biltong Bag - Food in Jars

I recently had the change to try the biltong made by a Pennsylvania company called Lehigh Biltong. It’s fresher tasting, more pleasant to eat than any jerky I’ve ever tried, and makes for a convenient, protein-packed snack. If you’re on a paleo diet or just trying to shift your snacking habits, it’s a really terrific option.

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Oatmeal Fruit Muffins from the Healthy Fats, Low-Cholesterol Cookbook

Oatmeal Fruit Muffins in tin - Food in Jars

So far in 2016, the culinary theme in my household has been comfort. Between the brutal cold and my mother-in-law’s declining health, we’ve all been turning to food for solace and support. This doesn’t mean that we’ve engaged in unchecked gluttony, but I’ve certainly done more baking and melting of cheese than is typical for an average February.

American Heart Association Cookbook - Food in Jars

Earlier this week, in searching for a balance between treat and nutrition, I cracked open the copy of the American Heart Association’s Healthy Fats, Low-Cholesterol Cookbook that arrived early in January. As I was thumbing through the pages, the recipe for Oatmeal-Fruit Muffins caught my eye.

Made with rolled oats, white whole wheat flour, wheat germ, applesauce, and dried fruit (among other things), they struck me as a sweet treat that would offer both comfort and enough satiating fiber to leave one contented and not in danger of eating the whole pan.

Oatmeal Fruit Muffins cooling rack - Food in Jars

They are also blessedly quick to make. No more than 30 minutes passed from the time I stood up to make them to the moment I was sliding the pan out of the oven. They also filled the apartment with a gorgeous scent, which I find offers nearly as much solace as the actual eating.

I will confess that I made a few changes to the recipe. I used an egg in place of the egg replacer, measured 2% rather than skim milk, and opted for dried cherries rather than suggested figs (I didn’t feel like dirtying a knife and cutting board to dice the dried figs I have).

They do turn a bit rubbery once they’re more than a day old, but a quick turn in the toaster oven or under the broiler revives these muffins nicely.

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