Giveaway: Lock Eat Jars from Luigi Bormioli

Lock Eat jars from from Luigi Bormioli are the first jars designed with both canning and serving in mind.

Lock Eat jars with their brand embossing

You might not know this about me, but I get positively giddy when I discover new canning jars. The most recent line of jars to send me over the moon? The Lock Eat jars from Luigi Bormioli. They are sleek, easy to use, and have a very pleasing heft to them.

An assortment of sizes of the Lock Eat jars.

They’re the first jars designed with the understanding that they will have multiple uses in our homes. They work beautifully for all manner of boiling water bath canning, but are also perfect for portable meals. The lid detaches completely and once removed, you’re left with a smooth container that’s ideal for yogurt, grain salads, and smoothies.

Lock Eat jars designed for holding juice

They come in two different shapes, and a number of sizes. The juice jar shape is available in 8.5, 20.5, and 34 ounces, and the straight-sided jars hold 2.75, 4.25, 6.75, and 11.5 ounces. All the Lock Eat jars are made in Italy, and are safe for both the microwave (once the lid is removed) and the dishwasher.

A GIF of how to securely close Lock Eat jars.

The lid is really easy to lock into place as well. Holding the base of the jar firmly, you just push the stainless steel arm down until it slides into position.

Lock Eat jars in a canning pot

I’ve had a small assortment of the Lock Eat jars in my kitchen for a little over a month now and have used them for leftovers, dry good storage, packed lunches and canning. So far, I like them a whole lot.

Hot Lock Eat jars ready to be filled

Using them for canning feels very much like processing preserves in Weck jars. Before you start making your preserve, arrange your selected jars in a canning pot (I’m using the Lagostina Martellata pasta pot here – more on that next week). Remove the rubber seals from the lids and arrange the glass lids in the pot as well. Bring to a boil. In a separate pot, simmer the rubber seals to soften.

Lock Eat jars filled with grape jelly.

Once your preserve is ready, remove the jars from the canner and fill them to the bottom of the solid glass band that runs around the top of the jars. This is a little more headspace than one leaves when working with mason jars, but it makes sense once you remember that the lid sits in the body of the jar and so takes up some of the header space.

The lid of a Lock Eat jar

Once the jars are filled, you ease the rubber seals back onto the lids, taking care to ensure that the tab is positioned so that it won’t be in the way of the latch when you go to lock the lids into place.

Three filled and closed Lock Eat jars

Then you wipe the rims and the top interior of the jars, place the lids onto the jars and carefully lock the lids into place.

(If you’re curious about the contents of these jars, check back tomorrow, when I’ll be sharing a recipe for low sugar grape jelly.)

The Lock Eat jars play nicely with regular jar lifters, provided that you take care to place the lifter on the sides of the jars, rather than get them tangled up with the lid latch. Set them into your canning pot and process as your recipe instructs.

Using a jar lifter to move Lock Eat jars

Once the processing time is up, remove the jars from the canner and set them on a folded kitchen towel to cool. Once the jars are completely cool, you can check the integrity of your seal by carefully releasing the clamp, grasping the lids, and lifting. If the lids stay firmly in place, the jars are sealed and can be stored in the pantry. As always, any unsealed jars should be refrigerated and used promptly.

The rubber seals can be safely reused for canning as long as they remain springy and in good shape. If they seem to be losing their elasticity, you’ll want to order new ones prior to canning with them again.

Cooled and sealed Lock Eat jars.

Because they want to spread the word about their new jars, the folks at Luigi Bormioli are offering up five sets of Lock Eat jars for this week’s giveaway. Each of the five winners will receive an assortment of 14 food and juice Lock Eat jars, at a retail value of $125.

To learn more about Lock Eat jars and watch a video of them being used for canning, make sure to visit this page on the Luigi Bormioli website. Use the widget below to enter the giveaway!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

If you like the looks of the Lock Eat jars, you can follow Luigi Bormioli on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and Instagram. Make sure to use the hashtag #LBandME if you post about them.

Disclosure: This is a sponsored post. Luigi Bormioli sent me the jars you see pictured here and paid a small fee to compensate me for my time and attention. All opinions remain entirely my own. 

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Upcoming Events: Fante’s! Terrain! Morris Arboretum!

Apples for Butter - Food in Jars

Friends! It’s hard to believe, but I have just nine events left in 2016. Help me make this final handful of classes, demos, and gatherings fun and successful! Mark your calendars, tell your friends, and come out and say hi!

Saturday, October 8 (South Philadelphia)
You’ll find me at Fante’s in the Italian Market from 11 am to 3 pm. I’ll be demonstrating how to make pear vanilla jam (a fresh demo starts every hour on the hour) and will have samples for tasting. I’ll also be signing books and answering canning questions. If you’ve never been to Fante’s, it is an independently owned kitchenwares store that is very much worth a visit.

Saturday, October 15 (Glen Mills, PA)
I’m teaching a canning class at Terrain at Styer’s. This gorgeous shop and garden center is a fabulous place to visit during the fall (so many gourds and pumpkins). In this class, we’ll collaboratively make a large batch of Pear Jam with Cinnamon and Vanilla and everyone will go home with a small jar. $25. Sign up here.

Sunday, October 16 (Chestnut Hill, PA)
The Bloomfield Farm at the Morris Arboretum is having their Fall Farm Day and I will be there from 12 noon to 4 pm demonstrating how to make honey sweetened jams and signing books.

Saturday, October 29 (Chestnut Hill, PA)
I’ll be back at the Morris Arboretum, this time for a canning class! In this morning workshop, I’ll show you how to make honey sweetened jams that are set with Pomona’s Pectin. Everyone who takes this class will go home with a small jar of the jam we made in class, along with a packet of information so that they can go home and do it themselves! 10:30 am to 12:30 pm. $40-45. Sign up here.

Thursday, November 3 (Exeter, PA)
I’m returning to the Reading area for a autumn-themed canning demonstration at the Exeter Community Library. I’ll be making honey-sweetened Cranberry Apple Jam and will have books available for sale and signature. 6-8 pm. Free.

Saturday, November 5 (Lawrence Township, NJ)
Fellow food writer Tenaya Darlington and I will be at Cherry Grove Farm for their annual Cow Parade Festival. I’ll do a short canning demo, and Tenaya will pair some of my preserves with the cheeses they make at Cherry Grove. We’ll both also have books on hand for sale and signature. Time TBD.

Tuesday, November 15 (Philadelphia)
I’m teaming up with the crew from Urban Farmer for a night of preserve-inspired menu items. More details to come! 6-9 pm.

Wednesday, November 16 (Glassboro, NJ)
My last library demo of the year is at the Glassboro branch of the Gloucester County Library. I’ll show you how to make a naturally sweetened autumn-themed preserve and will have books on hand for sale and signature. 7 to 8:30 pm. Free.

Thursday, December 1 (Easton, PA)
My final class of the year is at the Easton Public Market. We’ll make apple preserves and everyone will go home with a small jar of the preserves made in class. 7 to 9 pm. $30. Sign up here.

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Giveaway: Halloween-themed Jar Gear from Mason Jar Lifestyle

food-in-jars-halloween

Happy October, friends! To kick off the season of spooky, I’ve got a fun giveaway for you guys from our friends at Mason Jar Lifestyle (they’re a regular site sponsor). These lids, straw toppers, straws, and straw holders are the perfect way to get into the fun of Halloween in a way that’s reusable and sustainable!

Here’s what the winner of the giveaway will get:

To enter this fun giveaway, use the widget below.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

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Links: Salsa, Freezing Basil, and Winners

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I am home again (how many times have I typed those words over the last six months?). It has been such a pleasure to be out in the world so much this year, but I am now looking forward towards entering my more introverted season. I’m hoping to revive my sourdough starter, get a batch of kombucha bubbling away, and finally get my next book idea out of my brain and down on paper. Until then, a few links.

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The most recent giveaway for which there are winners is the one I hosted a couple of weeks ago with Emily Press (remember those fabulous labels!). The winners (as selected by the Rafflecopter randomizer) are Karapeers, Jennife, and Marilyn O. More tasty giveaways coming up soon!

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October Sponsors: Cuppow, Fillmore Container, EcoJarz, and More!

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I can’t quite believe it, but October is here and that means that it’s time to thank the people and businesses that help keep this site afloat. Tell them you appreciate their support of my work with a purchase or a social follow!

In the top spot our friends at Cuppow. They are the creator of the original mason jar travel mug topper and the BNTO, a small plastic cup that transforms a canning jar into a snack or lunch box. Parents and kids love their EIO set, with its grippy silicone sleeve and a lid that makes for easy sipping.

Lancaster, PA-based and family-owned Fillmore Container are next! They sell all manner of canning jars, lids, and other preservation gear. They just added a line of swing top bottles to their inventory, which are the perfect thing for kombucha, hot sauce, and infused simple syrups!

After some time away, our friends over at EcoJarz are as a sponsor. They make an array of products designed to fit on top of mason jars, and they just a kit for fermenters to their stock. It contains a wide-mouth stainless steel ring, a wide-mouth stainless steel lid with a silicone gasket and grommet, an airlock, and a fermenting guide.

iLids is a Seattle-based small business that makes both storage and drink lids in both regular and wide mouth sizes for mason jars. Their storage lids are water tight and the drink lids can accommodate a straw. Best of all, their lids come in a whole bunch of different colors, so there’s something for everyone!

MightyNest is an amazing resource for non-toxic, natural, and organic products for homes and families. I’m a big fan of the MightyFix, their monthly product subscription program. For a limited time, new members can subscribe and get their first month for just $5 (normally, it’s $10/month). Click here for more information.

Our friends at Mrs. Wages are on the roster again this month. They make pectin, vinegar, and more canning mixes than I can count. Their website is an incredible preserving resource and I can’t say enough good things about their salsa mix. If you need a little help getting your produce into jars, remember to seek out their products!

Orchard Road makes mason jars, lids, and rings for home canners. Their jars are sold in packs of six and come in sturdy boxes that can be used for storage. Orchard Road’s physical distribution is limited, but their online store is open for business, so you can now order them straight from the source.

Mason Jar Lifestyle is a one-stop shopping site for all the jar lovers out there. They sell all manner of mason jar accessories and adaptors. If you’re in the market for lids, straws, and cozies to transform your mason jars into travel mugs, make sure to check them out!

If your company or small business is interested in becoming a sponsor, you can find more details here. I offer discounts for multiple month purchases and am always happy to work with your budget. Leave a comment on this post or drop me a note to learn more!

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IMUSA, Goya, and Chicken, Bean, and Kale Stew

imusa-products

Years ago, when Scott and I were first married, we’d often go down to visit his mom in suburban Virginia for Thanksgiving. Near to her apartment was an international supermarket that I found impossibly tempting and so often on the night before the holiday, we’d find ourselves taking a recreational wander up and down the aisles.

imusa-calderos

I’d typically pick up a flat of fruit and an assortment of inexpensive spices as we zigzagged the the store. When we arrived at the section with Goya-branded beans, tomatoes, and other canned goods, my mother-in-law Joan would stop and say enthusiastically in her thick New York accent, “Goya makes a good product!”

goya-products

She made that comment frequently enough that it has become something Scott and I say every time we encounter Goya goods. Thing is, she was right. They do make a good product. Which is why, when I got an email asking if I would participate in a promotion with IMUSA and Goya Foods in honor of Hispanic Heritage Month, I said yes without a second thought.

skillet-chicken-ingredients

They sent me a bunch of IMUSA gear and a box bursting with Goya products. After a day spent admiring all the goodies, I used the bulk of the ingredients to cook up dinner (this was before I left for this most recent trip). It ended up being an easy, highly satisfying, and tasty dinner that I will recreate someday in the future.

finished-chicken-and-quinoa

In addition to sending me an assortment of gear, the folks from IMUSA and Goya want to share some of the Hispanic Heritage Month goodness with one of my readers. One lucky person will get an IMUSA Tortilla Warmer and a Goya Cookbook. Here’s how to enter.

  1. Leave a comment on this post and tell me what you’ve been cooking recently.
  2. Comments will close at 11:59 pm eastern time on Saturday, October 8, 2016. Winners will be chosen at random and will be posted to the blog on Sunday, October 9, 2016.
  3. Giveaway open to United States residents only.
  4. One comment per person, please. Entries must be left via the comment form on the blog at the bottom of this post.

Disclosure: I received a box of ingredients and tools to use in the creation of this post. I did not receive any additional compensation. All opinions expressed are my own. 

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