Upcoming Events: Princeton! Kennett Square! Lancaster!

Preserving by the Pint sliver

I know I’ve been saying this for weeks, but the end of my season of classes and events is now firmly in sight. If you’ve been wanting to take a class or pick up a signed copy of one of my books, now is the time. I have seven events left in October, two more in November and then I’m taking most of the next six months from doing classes, events, or book signings so that I can focus on writing my next book.

I’d like to draw particular attention to the pair of classes I’m teaching at Fillmore Container this weekend. These will be active, hands-on classes and all participants will get be taking home fresh, hot jars of delicious preserved food. If you’re at all interested in one or both of these classes, register today

October 8, Swarthmore, PA
I’ll doing a canning demo Harvey Oak Mercantile from 6-8 pm. There will be books available for sale and signature. Registration details to come.

October 9, Princeton, NJ
Thanks to a friend who has made all the arrangements, I’m headed to Princeton to offer a batch canning demonstration at the Whole Earth Center. Event is from 7-9 pm and tickets can be obtained here. Books will be available!

October 10, Kennett Square, PA
Every fall, Kennett Square throws a festival to celebrate all things fermented. I’ll be offering a quick sauerkraut demo and then will be appearing on a panel with some other ferment-friendly folks. The happenings will be at the Bayard Taylor Library. Demos will be from 6-7:30 pm, the discussion starts at 7:30, and admission is free. More details can be found here.

October 11, Lancaster, PA
I’m spending a Saturday at Fillmore Container, offering a pair of canning classes in their warehouse. The first class is from 10 am – 12 noon, in which we’ll focus on preserving pears in batches large and small (including information about how to use Pomona’s Pectin). From 1-3 pm, we’ll dig into how to preserve tomatoes, including how to make tomato jam and how to preserve whole peeled tomatoes. To register for both classes (they’re $35 a piece), click here. We’re also going to offer a book signing at the end of the day.

October 12, Cherry Hill, NJ
I’m hopping over the bridge to South Jersey for a small batch jam demonstration and book signing at Williams-Sonoma at the Cherry Hill Mall. The event is from 1-3 pm and is free and open to all.

October 14, Philadelphia
I’m teaching a sauerkraut class at the German Society of Pennsylvania from 7-9 pm. Everyone will make their own quart jar of sauerkraut to take home with them. Class fee is $15 and you can register by emailing librarian@germansociety.org. More details about this class can be found here.

October 18, Philadelphia
Canning demos and book signing at the Weaver’s Way Farm at Saul HS Harvest on Henry Festival. I’ll do a couple of demonstrations and will help judge the pie contest! More details can be found here. The festival runs from 1-5 pm and is open to all.

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Links: Grape Jelly, Peach Mustard, and Winners

There are three signed copies of Preserving by the Pint at Kitchenette!

For the last week, my body has been in Philadelphia, but my brain has mostly been occupied with happenings in Austin, TX. My sister is hugely pregnant with her second child and the baby-watch is on. I’m going to be heading down there at the end of the month to help and cook, but for now we wait.

Now, links.

EcoJarz giveaway products

Thanks for everyone who took the time to imagine a new mason jar adaptor in order to enter last week’s giveaway. Here are the winners:

If you didn’t win, stay tuned. I’ll have another jar-adaptor giveaway up tomorrow!

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Other People’s Preserves: Love Beets

Love Beets

Other People’s Preserve is my opportunity to shine a spotlight on some of the very delicious jams, pickles, and preserves being made by dedicated professional canners. If you spot one of these products in the wild, make sure to scoop up a jar packet.

In this week’s edition of preserves made people who are not me, I’m featuring a product that’s not quite a pickle, but is delicious nonetheless. It’s for those of you who love beets, but don’t necessarily love a super strong pickle.

Love Beets makes an array of pre-cooked, vacuum-sealed beets. Many are lightly pickled with flavors like balsamic vinegar or ginger and honey. Others are plain, awaiting your personal pickling treatment. They also make a fun snack pack that combines baby beets with cheese cubes and crackers.

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Cookbooks: Canning, Pickling, and Freezing with Irma Harding

Irma Harding cover

In the 1940s and 1950s, the company International Harvester had a fictional spokesperson named Irma Harding (much like the beloved Betty Crocker). She was the face of their refrigeration division and helped women across the country learn to prepare food for the fridge, freezer, and the canning pot.

Irma Harding spine

In recent years, Irma Harding was mostly forgotten, but in a new book by Marilyn McCray, her memory has been heartily revived. Canning, Pickling, and Freezing with Irma Harding is a volume that serves up the history of Irma herself, along with chapters detailing a number of food preservation techniques.

Irma Harding testing page

Each chapter features both a words of wisdom from Irma, along with relevant and up-to-date information about how to safely pickle, jam, can, ferment, and freeze food. Many sections also have useful line drawings instead of pictures for illustration. They are both whimsically vintage in look, but entirely accurate.

Irma Harding fermenting

If you want a little dose of canning history with your instructions and recipes, this book would make for a fun addition to your preserving library.

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Livestream Canning Demo at the Chemical Heritage Foundation

peach salsa demo at Linvillla

This picture is not of me at the Chemical Heritage Foundation, but it’s one of the few I have of me demonstrating somewhere.

Friends! Just a quick note to let you know that I’m doing a pair of canning demonstrations tonight at the Chemical Heritage Foundation in Old City, Philadelphia. These demos are part of First Friday events and are free and open to the public (should you want to stop by).

If you can’t make it in person, CHF will also be streaming the both presentations live (5:30 and 6:45), so you can see me in action, even if you’re far away.

I have embedded the livestream code after the jump in this blog post, so you can watch directly from this page. Or, if that’s not working in an ideal manner, you can also watch here.

Finally, if you can’t catch one of the demos live, they will live on indefinitely on the CHF Youtube page.

Continue Reading →

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Peach Vanilla Drizzle

peach vanilla drizzle vertical

Nearly two weeks ago, I bought a 25 pound case of visually imperfect peaches. They were a little hard when I first got them, so I arranged them on rimmed cookie sheets and set them around the apartment, pretending all the while that it is entirely normal to have a half bushel of fruit ripening on every surface of one’s home (this week, I have trays of Italian plums scattered about).

By day five, many of the peaches were perfectly ripe and so I began to preserve. I tested some recipes for the new book (the honey sweetened peach rosemary jam with a touch of salt was revelatory), and made a batch of peach salsa for my personal pantry. I was weary of peeling, so I convinced myself I was letting the rest of the peaches ripen up while I took a break from the canning pot.

peach drizzle pot

And then, on Tuesday, I realized I’d let things go a little too far. The remaining peaches were heady with fragrance and speckled with brown soft spots. I took them to the kitchen and started to cull. I threw away the furthest gone fruit and set about to salvage the remaining useful bits.

After an hour spent trimming, I had 8 cups of usable peach hunks. I combined the chopped (but unpeeled) fruit in a pan with 2 split and scraped vanilla beans and 2 cups of sugar. As soon as the sugar was dissolved, I popped a cover on the pan and shoved it in the oven at 350 degrees F for a couple hours (can you tell that I was feeling a little weary of dealing with fruit?).

peach vanilla drizzle labels

Once two hours had passed, I pulled the pan out of the oven and fished out the vanilla beans. Then I pulled out my beloved immersion blender and blitzed the peaches until they were entirely smooth. I tasted, added the juice of 1 lemon for balance, and pureed again.

Once I liked the flavor, I poured it into a collection of half and quarter pint jars (the yield was 3 1/2 pints when all was said and done) and processed them in a boiling water bath canner for 10 minutes.

peach drizzle in orchard road jars

The end result is a product that exists someplace between a syrup and fruit butter. It’s sweeter and thinner than my standard butters, but manages to have far more body than your standard syrup.

I’m calling it a drizzle, because it does just that very nicely. I ate the two tablespoons that wouldn’t fit into a jar over yogurt, but it would be a great pancake or waffle topper. If you’ve got some end-of-season stonefruit that is giving you fits, I highly recommend this treatment.

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