Cookbooks: Artisanal Preserves

In the last ten years or so, we (the cookbook consuming population) have become accustomed to cookbooks that burst with juicy images. However, there’s much to be said for quieter books that put the focus on the words and recipes rather than the art.

One such book that landed on my desk recently is Madelaine Bullwinkel‘s Artisanal Preserves. It’s a revised reissue of her Gourmet Preserves that was first published in 1987 and is unassumingly charming.

The book features traditional jams, jams without added sugar, jellies, marmalades, preserves, breads and muffins, and desserts. As you can see from that list, it’s a volume that focuses on the sweet side of preserving rather than trying to cover the entire spectrum.

There’s much in this book that intrigues me. Ones that are particularly triggering my interest are Tomato and Prune Jam (page 50), Rosemary Red Onion Jelly (page 103), Lime Zucchini Marmalade (126), Pear and Grape Preserves (page 158), and Marmalade Muffins (page 172).

If you like vintage cookbooks that burst with voice and personality, then the reissue of this canning classic is very much for you. If you can’t abide books without pictures, you should probably give this one a pass.

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Submit your August #fijchallenge Projects!

August is nearly over! Yet another month that has gone whooshing by with dizzying speed! I hope everyone has enjoyed their summer and managed to sneak in at least a little food preservation.

I posted the link to the submission form for this month’s Mastery Challenge in the monthly introductory post, but wanted to share it again here in case there were some of you who didn’t see it.

If you want to be counted in the August tally and included in the round-up, please use this form to submit your project by Wednesday, August 30 (that’s tomorrow!). The form is below!

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Wild Blueberry Jam with Berries from Maine

A few weeks ago, I did a slightly crazy thing. On Friday morning, I packed up my car, did some quick grocery shopping, and spent eight hours driving to Maine to teach a class at Frinklepod Farm. I got there around 10:30 pm, tumbled into a cozy bed tucked into stone room in a majestic barn, and woke up to a gorgeous morning, ready to teach.

I spent seven hours setting up, teaching (such a delightful group of students!), and cleaning up (thankfully, I had plenty of help from Flora and MaryJo) and then hopped back in the car and drove myself home. All told, I was only there for about 16 hours. I wish I’d managed to spend a little more time in Maine, but the craziness of late summer didn’t allow for me to spend any more time away from home.

Despite the shortness of my visit, I did manage to bring a little bit of Maine back home with me. Three perfect pints of intensely flavorful wild Maine blueberries.

Now, we get plenty of cultivated blueberries here in Philly, but these tiny wild berries are a different beast. Sturdy, tart, and intensely flavorful, they make gorgeous jam. They are also a little fiddly to separate from their stems (which is why, if you look closely, you’ll see a few stems. I lost my patience with trying to remove them all).

I used a ratio of three parts fruit to one part sugar for this batch (calculating by weight). This means, if you have access to wild blueberries and don’t have the exact amount that I used, you can still proceed with what you’ve got.

I might need to drive to Maine again next summer, so that I can make more of this tasty jam. (The jar labels pictured above are from site sponsor CanningCrafts and the jars are from site sponsor Fillmore Container).

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The Dinnertime Hand-off with Blue Apron

Today’s post is sponsored by Blue Apron.

Over the last year, I’ve had several opportunities to write about my experiences with Blue Apron meal kits. I’ve shared how I used them to be a good houseguest, how they helped me avoid take-out while preparing for a conference, and how they bumped me out of my weeknight dinner rut.

This time, our box of three meal kits (we get the plan designed for two people. Bigger households might like the family plan better) made all the difference during a week when I down with a rotten cold. Here’s why. Most of the time, when I make dinner, all the information lives in my head. I don’t follow a lot of recipes and often simply improvise with what we have.

This is an approach that works well for us when I’m functioning at the top of my game. But on those nights when I am sick, tired, or have to teach a class, keeping everything in my head makes it hard for Scott to step in and make dinner happen.

However, when we have a Blue Apron recipe to make, the hand-off is seamless. We’ve already got all the high-quality ingredients necessary, so there’s no shopping necessary. Then, I can start things, tell him exactly what I’ve done, and he can simply pick up where I’ve left off. Being able to surrender dinner responsibility to him without worry made all the difference for me this week. It was magical.

Another really exciting thing that happened for us with this Blue Apron box was the fact that one of the recipes helped push the boundaries of Scott’s culinary comfort zone. The chef-designed recipe for Chicken Tagine with Cherry Tomatoes, Dates, and Couscous initially did not speak to him (he’s not typically a fan of dried fruit in savory dishes). But after his plate was clean, he said he enjoyed it and would happily eat something like it again. Score one for Blue Apron!

In addition to the Chicken Tagine, we also had these Heirloom Tomato, Lamb, and Beef Burgers with Loaded Cheesy Potatoes (the burgers were really good, but those potatoes were amazing!) and the Fairytale Eggplant and Mozzarella Pizza (another winner).

One of the worries that people often have about Blue Apron is the amount of packaging involved. I continue to be impressed with how the amount of packing materials seems to reduce with every order I receive (and most of it is recyclable). If you can’t recycle the materials in your area, you can also opt to return the packing materials through the mail for reuse and recycling.

If you’re intrigued by my experience with Blue Apron, they’ve got an offer for you, too! The first fifty readers to use this link to sign up for the service will get three meals for free on their first Blue Apron order.

Oh, and if you want to take a peek at more of the possible meals you’ll get from Blue Aproncheck out their recipe page.

Disclosure: This post is sponsored by Blue Apron. They sent me a 2-Person box, containing three meals for two people. They’ve also compensated me for my time and attention. However, all thoughts and opinions expressed are entirely mine.

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Cookbooks: The Preservatory

Want a book with truly unique preserve recipes, along with good ideas to use them up? Then make sure to get a copy of The Preservatory!

Back in late June, I spent a day in New York at the summer Fancy Food Show. While there, I met Lee Murphy. She’s the owner and head jam maker at Vista D’Oro Farms and Winery in British Columbia and the author of The Preservatory, a lovely new preserves cookbook that was published this spring.

This gorgeous, hard cover book contains 80 recipes. Forty preserves and another 40 dishes, drinks, and baked goods that you can make with the contents of those glowing jars. The contents are organized by season, which is a structure I always appreciate.

I am so intrigued by the various preserves in this book. I’ve written a whole lot of recipes for jams, chutneys, butters, and spreads in my day and there are things in these pages that I’d never, ever thought of attempting. Three that particularly catch my attention are Sweet Corn with Espelette and Chardonnay (page 65), Spicy Sweet Charred Onion and Figs (page 86), and Olive with Orange and Lemon.

These recipes are all highly acidified with both lemon and apple juice and are given instruction for processing in a boiling water bath canner (though inexplicably, she gives a range of times for the boiling water bath). Still, that onion and fig jam speaks to me. I’m going to try and get my hands on some figs this week.

As far as the recipes designed to use up your preserves, there’s so much I want to make. I’ve bookmarked a number of them, and have my eye on the Savory Dutch Baby (page 130) for this weekend.

Bottom line on this book is that it contains some really interesting, creative recipes, unlike anything I’ve seen before. If you’re looking to bring some new inspiration into your homemade pantry, I can’t recommend it highly enough.

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Sweet Cherry Meyer Lemon Marmalade

Time is running out on cherry season but there’s still time to make this Sweet Cherry Meyer Lemon Marmalade! And if you can’t find Meyers, regular lemons will also do (thought get organic if you can!).

Seven jars of Sweet Cherry Meyer Lemon Marmalade

Back in early July, the good folks from the Washington State Stone Fruit Growers sent me a giant box of cherries as part of this year’s Canbassador program (8th year! Crazy!). I shared a recipe for spiced cherry preserves and another for sweet cherry ketchup, and then life got a little crazy (vacation! work travel! an endless cold!).

lemons and cherries for Sweet Cherry Meyer Lemon Marmalade

I promised I’d share recipes for the final two things I made with my cherry shipment, and I’m going to fulfill half that promise tonight with this recipe for Sweet Cherry Meyer Lemon Marmalade (I can’t find my notes from the cherry black raspberry jam, so that recipe may be lost until next season when I can take another stab at the combination).

I’m also motivated to get this recipe up because while sweet cherries are still available fresh, I hear that they’ll be around stores for no more than another week or two. So while we’re on clock here, it is still possible to make this preserve this year!

Ingredients in the pot for Sweet Cherry Meyer Lemon Marmalade

I’ve made a lot of different things with sweet cherries over the years and I’ve found that the preserves I like the best are the ones in which I aggressively temper their sweetness with tart, tangy, and sour flavors (case in point, these lightly pickled sweet cherries).

In the case of the this marmalade, I use a full pound of Meyer lemons to bring the pucker. These particular lemons were grown by the always-delightful Karen of Lemon Ladies Orchard and I hear she’s got a few summer lemons available, should you need to get your hands on some.

a close up on the jars of Sweet Cherry Meyer Lemon Marmalade

I approach this recipe over the course of two days. On day one, the cherries are stemmed, heaped in a pan with a cup of water, and simmered until soft. Then they’re left to sit overnight until cool. Simultaneously while the cherries do their initial cook, the lemons are cut into slivers, placed in a roomy bowl and covered them with two cups of water. They also soak overnight (this helps soften the rind and makes for a more pleasing finished texture.

The next day, you pinch the pits out of the cherries, add the lemons and their water, along with four cups of sugar. Finally, you boil it all down into a pleasingly sweet, tart, and spreadable marmalade that married seasons and flavors beautifully.

Oh, and one last thing. Should you want to see what some of the other Canbassadors have done this year, make sure to follow the Washington State Stone Fruit folks on social media, as they’ve been sharing all the posts. Here’s where you can find them.

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