Giveaway: Food-Themed Note Cards from League Street Press

you are unbeetable

My friend Joy Manning is a thank you note evangelist. In an age where people send their regards electronically (if they send them at all), Joy pulls out a pretty note card, writes a brief but thoughtful message, and then hands it off to the US Postal Service. I have been on the receiving end of Joy’s note writing habit more than once and I’m always delighted to receive a piece of physical mail beyond bills and coupons for Bed, Bath, and Beyond.

League Street Press cards

Last spring, Joy gave a talk at Eat, Write, Retreat about how her note writing habit is integral to her career networking strategy (she’s a freelance food writer, recipe developer, and editor) and how it has often brought more assignments her way. I was there for her talk and I was inspired enough to dig out my dusty stack of thank you notes and write appreciations to people who have helped me over the years.

olive my love

In a move that has delighted many (or, at the very least, me), Joy has launched a line of food-themed note cards in partnership with her friend Sam Bednarek under the name League Street Press. Each card has a fruit or vegetable on the front, along with a punny line. I particularly like the “olive my love” design that you see above. Sam is a graphic designer and art director and she designed the cards and created the art. Joy came up with the lines and developed the recipes that are printed on the back.

no-churn peach ice cream

And let me tell you, these recipes aren’t throwaways. Joy tested and retested these dishes in order to come up delicious things that would be both easy and appealing. I had a chance to taste the No-Churn Peach Ice Cream when it was in development and so I speak from first-hand experience when I say that it’s truly fabulous and is such a good option for those of us who can’t find space in our freezers to chill an ice cream bowl (I am sure that I’m not the only one with this issue).

Best of all, these note cards are perfectly sized to slip right into a recipe box, so your recipient will be able to add it to their recipe collection with tearing or folding your thoughtful note.

League Street Press back

The cards can be bought as singles ($4 a piece) or in boxes of eight ($20 for a box). They are printed on sturdy card stock and both the cards and envelopes are made from 100% recycled paper.

Thanks to Joy and Sam, I have one box of eight note cards to give away to a lucky Food in Jars reader. Here’s how to enter:

  1. Leave a comment on this post and share a thank you note story. Did your parents make you write them when you were growing up? Or is it a habit you never quite picked up?
  2. Comments will close at 11:59 pm on Saturday, February 22, 2014. Winners will be chosen at random and will be posted to the blog on Sunday, February 23, 2014.
  3. Giveaway open to US and Canadian residents.
  4. One comment per person, please. Entries must be left via the comment form on the blog at the bottom of this post.

Disclosure: League Street Press gave me one set of these notecards for photography purposes and are providing a second set for the giveaway. No money has changed hands. I just think they’re cool and so I wanted to share them with you. 

Links: More Kumquats, Pickled Cabbage, and a Winner

Leftovers, citrus, and tea. A perfect at-home Sunday brunch.

Scott had a birthday late last week and so we’ve had an long weekend of celebration and much indulgent eating. It’s been fun, but I’m looking forward to getting back to a life that involves a few more vegetables and a bit less birthday cake and french fries. Other than that, it’s been all book tour planning, all the time. If you check out the Classes and Events page, you’ll see that I’ve been slowly adding to it for the spring. Some dates don’t have a ton of info yet, but I’m updating it daily, so keep checking back! Now, links!

white beans

We have a winner in the Weck jar and Dutch oven giveaway sponsored by Mighty Nest that was part of the pressure canned beans post. It’s Heather Shaut from Ohio! Congratulations Heather!

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Photos From the Food in Jars Flickr Pool

Each weekend, I dig through the Food in Jars Flickr pool and feature some of your photographs here in this space. If you’d like to see your hard work on the blog, please add your images to the group! And just so you know, Instagram and camera phone images are more than welcome (and it’s easy to set up your Instagram photos to feed to a Flickr account). Here are this week’s selections.

IMG_5668

These jars of gorgeous spiced and pickled daikon radish come to us from Ilene of the Urban Canning Company.

Picante pickled carrots

Some pack a punch picante pickled carrots  from  Erin of Putting Up With Erin.

marm jars

Could a preserve be any prettier? Mixed citrus marmalade from Rebecca at Cakewalk.

Last jam of the night: spiced blueberry.

A little spiced blueberry blast from the past! Take by Melissa from The Boastful Baker during  a late night canning session.

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Cookbooks: Whole Grain Mornings

Whole Grain Mornings cover

For weeks now, Whole-Grain Mornings has been sitting at the very top of my cookbook stack. I have read it cover to cover, been charmed by its friendly voice, and have even cooked several recipes from its pages (it is a sure sign that I’m in cookbook love if I manage to make more than one thing from it).

It is a book that embodies how I like to cook and eat and I have a feeling that it will appeal to a whole heck of a lot of you as well.

Whole Grain Mornings spine

Written by Megan Gordon (she blogs at A Sweet Spoonful, is a regular contributor to The Kitchn, and is the owner and head baker of Marge Granola), this volume contains recipes designed for the morning (though truly, many of them would also work perfectly well as a lunch, dinner, or snack).

WGM pantry section

The book breaks down into seven sections. Megan starts things off by sharing a little bit of her own story and how life led her to a career in writing and granola making. Then comes a section devoted to the pantry staples that will help you make these recipes, what exactly it means when you see the words “whole grain,” and even how best to store them.

Next is a section called the basics which offers up staple recipes for homemade yogurt, Megan’s very best oatmeal technique, a whole grain pancake mix, infused honeys, and a nut milk how-to.

Honeyed Tangerine and Lemon Marmalade

After that, we get into seasonal sections (this is a good two-thirds of the book). Each of these sections is carefully balanced to include recipes that are good for busy weekdays, some that are perfect to serve friends at brunch, others for slow sundays, and finally some spreads and toppings to enhance the other recipes.

January 23

So far, my very favorite thing from Whole Grain Mornings is the recipe for the Vanilla and Cream Steel-Cut Oats. I’ve long been a fan of steel cut oats and back in my days as an office worker, would regularly make up a big batch on Sunday nights to portion out and eat for breakfast throughout the week.

steel cut oats porridge

However, the way I made them in those days was incredibly bland and more about workday survival than flavor and satisfaction. If I’d known to toast my oats in a bit of butter, cook them with some milk added to the water, and finish them with a handful of golden raisins, I’d have enjoyed those breakfasts a good deal more.

The bottom line on this book is that I am enjoying it a great deal and I have a hunch that you would too!

 

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Preserves in Action: Homemade Tomato Soup

finished tomato soup

We are in the throes of another winter storm here in the Philadelphia area. Schools are closed, roads are impassable, and the sidewalks are treacherous. I don’t find the weather too much of an inconvenience, as I always work from my dining room table or my desk behind the television and thanks to my canning habit, I can go for days without needing to grocery shop.

roasted tomatoes packed in oil

But the conditions have been bad enough that Scott’s office has been closed at least three times since the beginning of January. He was home again today and around noon, managed to look both plaintive and hopeful as he said, “Do we have anything good for lunch?”

There’s been a bit of chatter on the Food in Jars Google Community page about tomato soup and so I suggested the classic pairing of toasted cheese sandwiches and bowls of warm soup.

pouring tomato puree

This qualified as good in his book and so I got out a small soup pot, pulled down a jar of tomato puree, and got to cooking. I started by browning 1/2 a minced onion in 1 tablespoon of butter. While the onions sizzled, I chopped up a few of my precious slow roasted tomatoes and added them to the pot.

I’ve taken to keeping a jar of these tomatoes in the fridge, packed in olive oil (a good layer of oil keeps them from getting moldy). It makes them more readily available for use than if they’re all frozen and so I use them more often in my daily cooking. They do add such a fabulous punch of concentrated tomato flavor.

February 13

Then I added 1 quart of the tomato puree (simply tomatoes run through a press and simmered until slightly thickened prior to canning), 1 cup of half and half (milk would have been fine too, but since I had the good stuff, I went with it), 2 tablespoons of honey, and 1 1/2 teaspoons salt.

I simmered the mixture of a few more minutes and then used to an immersion blender to smooth out the lumps and bits of onion. It was perfect for the chilly day and we both had two bowls.

For those of you also living through this latest round of weather, I do hope you’re staying warm and well-fed!

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An Update on the Canning 101/New to Canning Plan

spices

Several weeks back, I wrote a post asking for feedback about my Canning 101 and New To Canning categories. It’s taken me a little bit of time to digest all the questions and figure out how to tackle them. I found that they shake out into about ten categories (though one is something of a catchall). Here’s what I’m finding that you’re interested in:

  • Canning Basics
  • Fruit Preserves
  • Pickles
  • Tomatoes
  • Sugar
  • Altitude Adjustments
  • Recipe Sourcing and Development
  • Pressure Canning
  • Using Preserves
  • Other Questions

What I’ve done is tried to pull out all the individual questions. Though I have answered many of these questions in one way or another, often those responses are buried in the middle of another post and so aren’t always easy to find. So here’s the plan. Starting next week, I’m going to start answering these questions. I probably will jump around the list a lot and will occasionally group two or three questions together if I think they are different sides of the same coin.

Some of these posts will be short and will live forever under the Canning 101 header. Others will be longer, tutorial-style posts and will get filed under the New to Canning. Hopefully, they’ll all be both useful and interesting. I’m going to use the list below as something of an index, so I will link the questions to the answers once they’re written and I may add to the list as I work.

Finally, if you have a question and don’t see it here, leave a comment and I’ll add it to the list!

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