Links: Plums, Tomatoes, and Stovetop Granola

kraut toast

Autumn is nearly here and while I’ll miss the long days, the warmth, and the produce (oh, the produce!), I am so very happy for things to be slowing down a bit. I have just a couple more classes on the schedule before settle myself back into a regular routine, catch up on email, and start plotting out the tour for my next book. While I gather myself, may I offer you some links?

There’s no winner to report this week because there was no giveaway last week! However, I’ll have a nice one up tomorrow, so stay tuned!

 

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CSA Cooking: A Trio of Salads and Dips

tomato salad

This month’s Philly Foodworks share arrived during an intensely busy week. My mom was in town, we were prepping for the family wedding, and soon after, I was on my way out of town. I did my best to make quick work of the most perishable things and these three little dishes were the results.

First up is this tomato mint salad. We typically pair tomatoes with basil, but they go awfully well with mint as too. This particular salad contained one large heirloom tomato, half a finely chopped white onion, and a generous fistful of torn mint. The dressing was a big pinch of kosher salt, four turns of the pepper grinder, and a few lashings of olive oil (about two tablespoons, if I had to guess). Add some homemade croutons and it would be a tasty panzanella.

corn salad

Next up is this quick corn salad. It consisted of six lightly cooked ears of corn (five minutes in a pot with an inch of simmering water). After a rinse of cold water, I hacked the kernels off the cob (saving them for stock), and combined them with half a minced red onion (you could also use the other half of the white one from the tomato salad above), and a couple handfuls of roughly chopped mustard greens.

The dressing was 2 tablespoons olive oil, 3 tablespoons champagne vinegar, a teaspoon of kosher salt, and a whole bunch of freshly ground black pepper.

eggplant dip

Last one is a roasted eggplant dip. Preheat your oven to 400 degrees F and line a baking dish with parchment. Cut a big eggplant in half, drizzle it with a little olive oil and throw five or six garlic cloves (still in their wrappers) in the pan as well. Roast the eggplant, cut side up, until it is brown (maybe 15 to 20 minutes). When the eggplant is tender, it is done.

Let the roasted halves cool until you are able to handle them. Scoop out the flesh and put it in a bowl or container. Squeeze the garlic out of their peels and add them to the eggplant. Add 1 teaspoon of olive oil, the juice of one lemon, and a pinch of salt. For a chunky dip, mash it with a fork. For something smoother, zap it with an immersion blender (that’s what I did).

salad trio dinner

We actually ate all three of these dishes together with Joy’s chicken ricotta meatballs for dinner, but any one would make a nice addition to a meal.

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Sponsored Post: An Alternative to Plastic Wrap from MightyNest’s MightyFix

Bee's Wrap pair

Last month, I wrote about the new subscription service, called MightyFix, from our friends at MightyNest. For $10 a month, they’ll send you full sized product that is actually worth at least $10 (and often, will have a far higher price point) and they’ll ship it for free. What’s more, anything else you want to add to your FIX from their site also ships for free.

Bee's Wrap side by side

For the September FIX, MightyNest is featuring a product called Bee’s Wrap. I first wrote about this nifty food storage solution two years ago and it remains one of my favorite tools for reducing plastic waste in the kitchen. And, as an added bonus, they’ve also included a recipe card featuring my Honey Sweetened Blueberry Jam with this FIX!

beeswrap radishes

photo courtesy of MightyNest/Bee’s Wrap

It is made in Vermont from organic cotton muslin that has been imbued with beeswax, jojoba oil, and tree resin. You wrap a sheet around a block of cheese, a loaf of bread, or a dish, and then use the heat of your hands to mold the fabric into place. It keeps food fresh and when your sheet of Bee’s Wrap does wear out, you can put it in the compost instead of the landfill (can’t say that about plastic bags).

mightynestbeeswrap

photo courtesy of MightyNest/Bee’s Wrap

I find that these wrappers are quite easy to care for. For crumbs and condensation, a quick rinse will do it. For sticky residue, a wipe of gentle dish soap and a rinse in lukewarm water (you want to avoid the hottest water your tap can produce, in order to prevent the wax from melting off the fabric) is all you need. Let them air dry and then they’re ready to reuse again.

photo courtesy of MightyNest/Bee's Wrap

photo courtesy of MightyNest/Bee’s Wrap

If this sounds intriguing, here’s the MightyFix deal for this month. If you haven’t already been a MightyFix subscriber and you sign up using the widget below, you’ll get your first month of the FIX for free.

The retail cost for the two wraps that this month’s FIX includes costs $13.10 + $5.95 for shipping. Without the FIX, you’d pay $19.05. And remember, if you want to order anything else from MightyNest, you won’t pay a cent in shipping. It’s a darned good deal!

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Upcoming Events: Franklinville, NJ! Bala Cynwyd, PA! Online!

class image revised

Good morning, friends! We’re coming to the end of my teaching and demonstration season, but I have a few more events where you can catch me!

Tonight (September 17), I’ll be at the Franklin Township Library in Franklinville, NJ for a free small batch jam making and canning demonstration. I’ll be making the plum star anise jam from Preserving by the Pint and will be getting that going at the 6:30 pm. You can find more details here.

This Saturday (September 19), I’m demonstrating how to make and can a small batch of pear vanilla jam at the Cynwyd Station Cafe, in Bala Cynwyd, PA. We’ll be kicking that off at 3 pm. I’ll have books for sale and signature and will offer tastes of the jam when it’s finished.

On Tuesday night (September 22), I’m offering another live, online class via Concert Window. This class will focus on low sugar jam making and the tricks I employ to make Pomona’s Pectin work well for me. The class will start promptly at 8 pm eastern time and will last about an hour. There’s no set fee for these online classes, instead I just ask that you pay what feels comfortable for you. Sign up here.

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Links: Roasted Tomatoes, Basil Salt, and a Winner

canning street sign

I spent last night on a red eye, traveling back home to Philadelphia from San Francisco. I was in the Bay Area for a whirlwind three days for the Good Food Awards judging (and a bit of family time). Now I’m settling in to being home (at least for the next week) and trying to catch up on my overflowing inbox. While I type away, here are a few links for you!

inside cheese kit

The winner of the Hobby Hill Farm cheese kit giveaway is #132/Jen Y. And don’t forget, you can get 10% off on a Hobby Hill Farm purchase by using the code “FIJ.”

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Making Mozzarella with Hobby Hill Farm’s Kit

Hobby Hill Farm cheese making kit

Did I say that I was going to write about my experience using the Hobby Hill Farm cheese making kit on Tuesday? It appears that I actually meant Thursday. Oops!

PIC_6519

Step one with any new food endeavor is to read the instructions carefully and make sure you have all ingredients and gear. The kit comes with every necessary ingredient except for the milk. As far as gear goes, you need a big pot, a slotted spoon, a microwave-safe bowl, and a thermometer to track the temperature of the milk.

PIC_6523

While the milk heats, you dissolve citric acid in water and a bit of rennet in another small portion of water.

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