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Peach Mustard

It’s day four of Peach Week 2018! Monday, I shared a tiny batch of Peach Cardamom Jam. Tuesday was all about the Peach Walnut Conserve! On Wednesday, we moved on to Peach Chutney with Toasted Whole Spices. Today is Peach Mustard day. 

Homemade mustards are great. Easy to make and super delicious, they are a fun way to bring a little extra magic to your next sandwich. The primary trick I’ve learned over the years of making mustards is that they taste better when you grind or crush the seeds rather than blitzing them in a blender or food processor. It’s more work, but the flavor payoff is really great. The best way to do it is to double up some resealable food storage bags and then bash them with a rolling pin or sturdy bottle.

This blog post was written in partnership with the good people at the Washington State Stone Fruit Growers as part of my role as official Canbassador. They sent me 18 pounds of peaches and asked me to preserve them. I’ll be posting peach recipes all week long, so check back tomorrow for the next installment. For more about Washington State Fruit, follow them on social media!

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Peach Chutney with Toasted Whole Spices

It’s day three of Peach Week 2018! Monday, I shared a tiny batch of Peach Cardamom Jam. Yesterday was all about the Peach Walnut Conserve! Today, we’re moving on to chutney. 

I’ve been making versions of this chutney for more than eight years now. I originally devised it using tomatoes and have since made it with plums, pears, and now, peaches. It’s got a seriously assertive flavor, thanks to a healthy dose of vinegar and all those spices.

Often I will tell you that it doesn’t matter how you cut your fruit, but when it comes to this preserve, I advise you to be thoughtful with your cuts so that they are of mostly uniform size. It helps the chutney cook evenly and makes for a really beautiful finished product.

If you follow me on Instagram, you might have spotted this photo, in which I called this my Indian spiced peach chutney. I’ve decided to let that title go, because this preserve is an invention built on things I’ve read and experienced. It has no right to claim any kind of authenticity.

This blog post was written in partnership with the good people at the Washington State Stone Fruit Growers as part of my role as official Canbassador. They sent me 18 pounds of peaches and asked me to preserve them. I’ll be posting peach recipes all week long, so check back tomorrow for the next installment. For more about Washington State Fruit, follow them on social media!

Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | Pinterest

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Vidalia Onion Relish

Back in June, a box of Vidalia onions arrived in the mail. I arranged them prettily in a wooden bowl and let them sit. While they’re less storage friendly than other onions, they were far less demanding than the berries and cherries that were tumbling through my kitchen. Each week, I’d look at that bowl and think to myself, “this week. This week I’ll make a batch of onion relish.”

Then, that week would fly by and I’d start the process over again.

However, last night it happened. I made a batch of Vidalia Onion Relish. And I did it live. I riffed on a recipe from the National Center for Home Food Preservation that I first learned about from Lyn at Preserving Now (I trust her implicitly when it comes to ingredients native to Georgia). I’d made it first a few years back and when those jars were gone, I knew I had to make it again.

My version is a fairly thick cut relish, so much so that one might even call it a pickle. Because I like to eat it alongside chicken sausage or on a post-Thanksgiving turkey sandwich, I think of it as a relish. To make it more like a true relish, you could use a grater blade on a food processor rather than a slicer blade, or a grinder attachment on stand mixer (or even an old school hand crank grinder). It’s really up to you.

However you make it, this is one worth having in the pantry.

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Corn Relish with Turmeric

Corn relish has never really been on my radar. I’ve always been of the mind that if I was going to make a corn condiment, I’d make corn salsa and call it done. But this year, I kept seeing relish recipes and the idea of making one started to make sense. Then, when I came home with two dozen ears of corn, it became an inevitability.

I used Ball’s recipe on freshpreserving.com as a starting point, and made just a few (safe!) tweaks to bring it in line with my personal preferences.

I’m really pleased with the result. It’s tangy, sweet, and tastes gorgeously of summer. While I love my corn salsa and will continue to make multiple batches each summer, I think I’ve got a second must-make corn condiment on my personal list.

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Kosher Dill Pickle Spears from Ball® Fresh Preserving Products

This post is sponsored by Ball® Fresh Preserving Products by Newell Brands.

Last month, I teamed up with my friends at Ball®Fresh Preserving Products by Newell Brands to share their recipe for Honey Cinnamon Pears and the Honey Cinnamon Pear Sorbet I made with it. (Back in May, I did their Mixed Berry Jam and made Jammy Baked Oatmeal.) This month, we’re talking pickles.

Kosher Dill Pickle Spears, to be precise. These pickles are the exact image my brain conjures when I think of a classic kosher dill and they live up to their name in both form and flavor.

This style of pickle is one of the most versatile in the homemade pantry. They are great with sandwiches, tucked Chicago-style into hot dogs, or diced and stirred into dressings and relishes.

It’s an incredibly easy pickle to make. You start (as with most canning projects) by placing your jars in a canning pot, filling it about two-thirds full of water, and bringing it to a low simmer. While the canner heats, grab a few pounds of pickling cucumbers, trim the ends (make sure to remove the blossom end!), and cut them into spears.

Combine the water, vinegar, sugar, and salt in a small saucepan and bring it to a boil. Once the canning pot has come to a simmer and the jars are hot, remove one jar. Working quickly, place dill, garlic, Pickle Crisp®, and spices into the bottom of the jar. Pack the cucumber spears into the jar, fill it with the hot brine to 1/2 inch headspace, and wiggle out the air bubbles (top with more brine if the level has dropped below 1/2 inch).

Wipe the rim, apply the lid and ring, and return the jar to the canner. Repeat the process with the remaining jars. Once all the jars are filled, process them in the boiling water bath canner for 15 minutes. When the time is up, turn off the heat, remove the lid and let the jars stand in the hot water for an additional five minutes

Once the jars have finished cooling in the water, remove them from the canning pot and place them on a folded kitchen towel to cool. These pickles like to have at least a week in the jar to allow the flavor to infuse before you open them up. Check in tomorrow for a recipe that will show you how to use them in a most delicious way.

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Spiralized Pickled Golden Beets with Ginger

I bought a spiralizer three years ago and while I enjoy the novelty of vegetables cut into shapes other than that which I can achieve with a knife, I can’t quite convince myself that long strands of zucchini or eggplant are actually noodles. Still, I find that it has a place in my overstuffed kitchen, if for no other reason that it is fun (and sometimes that is enough).

I first made these spiralized pickled golden beets a little over a year ago and they are one of my favorite things to add to soba noodle salads or heap on top of an Ak-Mak cracker spread with fresh ricotta cheese (I realize that’s an oddly specific application, but darn if it isn’t delicious).

You can certainly make these pickles without having a spiralizer at your disposal, but it does lend a bouncy, curly-fry spring to the finished pickle, which I enjoy. Without a spiralizer, you’d just cut the raw beets into thin slices and then cut those slices into narrow matchsticks (a mandoline would help with this, though I find that they are a little iffy with dense vegetables like raw beets).

The most important thing when making these pickles is to strive for thin cuts. The only cooking that the beets receive is a short simmer in the brine, so in order to keep them from being aggressively crunchy, you need to aim for narrow matchsticks or curls.

I make these pickles with an assertive volume of ginger, which I find both boosts and balances the earthiness of the beets. I tried spiralizing the ginger for one batch, and found that it didn’t do a good enough job of distributing the ginger throughout the jar of pickled beets. Instead, every so often, I’d take a bite expecting beet and get a mouth full of *ginger* instead. While not exactly unpleasant, it wasn’t what I was aiming for. A fine dice works better.

I make these pickles to keep in the fridge, because I find that I like the texture best, and it also means that I don’t have to use quite as much vinegar, rendering them a bit more mellow. They do fade over time, so if you can’t abide still delicious, but slightly grey pickles, make them in smaller batches or eat them quickly.

I’m curious if you guys are using spiralizers to prep vegetables for pickling. Any experiences you’d like to share?

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