Yellow Plum Apricot Jam + Facebook Live

This little batch of yellow plum apricot jam is sweetened with honey and is gorgeously sunny and bright.

yellow plum apricot jam

A giant thank you to everyone who joined me on Facebook Live last night! I had a great time talking my way through a batch of jam and answering your many canning questions. I had such a good time that I’m going to do it again next week. Join me again on Tuesday, July 19 at 9 pm EDT/6 pm PDT. I’m not sure what I’ll make yet, but I’ll announce it over the weekend (when I have a better idea of what produce I’ll have on hand).

If you missed it last night, you can still watch, and in fact, the video is embedded below. Just skip over the first 3 minutes, because I started a little early to make sure the technology was going to work and then left it running while I finished getting ready. I won’t do that next time. Live and learn.

Finally, the recipe I made last night is after the jump. You could easily double the batch, should you wish! It’s set up with Pomona’s Pectin, so there’s a bit more flexibility in the size of the batch than there is when you’re not working with pectin.

Honey Sweetened Yellow Plum Apricot Jam

Yield: makes between 2 and 3 half pints.

Ingredients

  • 1 pound yellow plums, pitted and chopped
  • 1/2 pound apricots, pitted and chopped
  • 8 ounces honey, divided
  • juice of half a lemon
  • 1 teaspoon calcium water
  • 1 teaspoon Pomona's Pectin

Instructions

  1. Prepare a boiling water bath canner and the necessary jars.
  2. Combine the plums and apricots in a pot with 6 ounces of honey, the lemon juice, and the calcium water. Stir to combine and then let sit for a few minutes, until the honey has helped pull the juice out of the fruit.
  3. Set the pot on the stove over high heat and bring the fruit to a boil. Once it is happily bubbling, reduce the heat to medium-high. Cook, stirring often, until the fruit has softened, the syrup has thickened, and the overall volume has reduced by at least a third. If your fruit is still really chunky, use a potato masher to help break down the big pieces.
  4. Mash the pectin powder into the remaining honey and stir it into the cooking jam. Cook for an additional minute or two, until you see the jam visibly thickening.
  5. Remove the pan from the heat. Funnel the jam into the prepared jars. Wipe the rims, apply the lids and rings, and process in a boiling water bath canner for 10 minutes.
  6. When time is up, remove jars from canner and let them cool on a folded kitchen towel.
  7. Once they're cool enough to handle, test the seals by pressed down on the lids. Sealed lids will feel firm and solid. Unsealed lids will pop up and down as you press them.
  8. Sealed jars are shelf stable for up to a year. Unsealed jars should be refrigerated and used promptly.
http://foodinjars.com/2016/07/yellow-plum-apricot-jam-honey/

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10 Responses to Yellow Plum Apricot Jam + Facebook Live

  1. 1
    Emily says:

    Loving your blog! And your classes seem really fun! I love to pickle and ferment and am a huge fan of http://www.bubbies.com sauerkraut, but I’ve never canned before. You’ve inspired me to give it a try!

  2. 2
    Lisa S. says:

    Just started canning and loved your video. Very informative for a newbie!

    Thanks!

  3. 3
    Dianne says:

    Unfortunately I am such an old fuddy duddy I am not on FB. But I would have loved to ask you this question last night. My daughter has married a wonderful young man from India. She wanted to can tomatoes this summer and add all the Indian spices he likes. Will the adding of as much as a tablespoon (a generous one) of spices per jar change the acidity?? I hate to add vinegar, tomatoes are so sweet and lovely this time of year, but I also would hate for a whole batch of spicy tomatoes to go bad. Any suggestions??
    Love your blog!!!

    • 3.1
      Marisa says:

      I would strongly advise that you keep the spices out of the tomatoes and add them when the jars get opened and the tomatoes get used. I don’t know exactly what a tablespoon of spices per jar would do, but that’s a considerable amount. What’s more, spices increase in intensity over time and I would imagine that using that amount of spices could potentially become unpleasant as the tomatoes sit.

      Oh, and you don’t have to have a FB account to watch the livestreams. Next time, just go to facebook.com/foodinjars. You can see it without evening signing in!

  4. 4
    Sande says:

    Thank you for your video on FB, watched part of it last night as I was cooking down some fruit to can.

  5. 5
    Rae says:

    I loved watching this video! Your books got me into canning and preserving, and they’re my favorite resources! I watched this while making bacon-onion jam tonight, and can’t wait to try out this recipe! Much love from North Carolina!

  6. 6
    Marshall says:

    I very much enjoyed your video. I like the fact you filmed it at home instead of a mega dream kitchen that most of us can never hope of owning added to the enjoyment.

  7. 7
    Joan Griffin says:

    Thank you so much for this, It’s been ages I’m looking for something like this but I can never find anything that I like. loved the video, it’s so fun! Your blog is amazing!

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