Blood Orange Curd

blood oranges

A couple weeks ago, I was walking through Reading Terminal Market when I spotted a bin of blood oranges. They were relatively small, but the sign said they were just 4 for $1 and so I picked up eight. I had no plan for them beyond making something delicious. I buy produce like this far too often.

juiced blood oranges (and one lemon)

I considered making marmalade, but I still have one jar left from last year (and I’ve been working on a few varieties with Meyer lemons and Cara Cara oranges). As I thought over my other options, it occurred to me that it’s been far too long since I had a jar of curd in the fridge. And so the decision was made.

blood orange juice

The nice thing about making blood orange curd is that it only needed half of my oranges (so I may just make myself a batch of blood orange shrub). I added the juice of one lemon to the mix to up the pucker a little and had a very generous 1/2 cup, which is exactly what I needed.

eggs

Whenever I make a curd, I always make sure to search out the very best eggs, because they contribute both color and flavor to the finished product. The only problem with that in this particular curd is that the yolks were so vividly orange that they muddied the ruby color of the blood orange juice. Happily, the resulting salmon color doesn’t impact the flavor, it just looks a little funky.

blood orange curd

Let’s talk briefly about canning and curds. In my first book, I included three curd recipes. Because of differing acid contents, two are deemed safe for canning and one is not (I take my cues from the National Center for Home Food Preservation).

These days, I don’t can my curds at all, even when working with those that are higher in acid (which this one is not). That’s because I find that the texture often firms up unpleasantly in the boiling water bath canner. Curds will keep a couple weeks in the fridge and up to six months in the freezer.

blood orange curd in yogurt

Let’s talk a little about what you can do once you have a batch of curd in the fridge. You can use it to fill a layer cake. You can smooth it into a tart shell. You can dip berries into it. You can dollop it on scones or biscuits. Or, you can do my favorite thing in the whole world and stir it into a bowl of Greek yogurt. The combination is sweet, creamy, and just a bit tart. Truly, it’s the best thing ever.

Blood Orange Curd

Yield: makes approximately 1 pint

Ingredients

  • 3-4 blood oranges
  • 6 egg yolks
  • 3/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 4 ounces unsalted butter, cut into cubes

Instructions

  1. Remove the zest from the oranges with a Microplane and set it aside. Juice the oranges and measure out a generous 1/2 cup of the juice. Taste it and add a splash of lemon juice if you feel it needs a little extra pucker.
  2. Pour an inch of water into a medium saucepan and bring it to a simmer over medium-high heat.
  3. Whisk together the juice, zest, egg yolks, and sugar in a heatproof bowl that will sit comfortably over the simmering saucepan.
  4. Place the bowl over the saucepan. Switch to a spoon or silicone spatula and start stirring. Keep stirring until the curd thickens, coats the back of the spoon, and starts to cling to the sides of the pan between stirring. If the eggs look like they're starting to scramble instead of thicken, pull the bowl off the saucepan and turn the heat down.
  5. When the curd has thickened sufficiently, remove it from the heat and stir in the butter.
  6. Position a fine mesh sieve over a bowl and push the curd through. This removes the zest and any bits of scrambled egg (no matter how careful you are, you always end up with a few).
  7. Scrape the finished curd into a jar and let it cool. Once it's down to room temperature, put a lid on the jar and pop it in the fridge.

Notes

This curd keeps for 10-14 days in the fridge. If you want to keep it longer, divide it into smaller jars and freeze them.

Schema/Recipe SEO Data Markup by ZipList Recipe Plugin
http://foodinjars.com/2014/02/blood-orange-curd/

Related Posts:

,

22 Responses to Blood Orange Curd

  1. 1
    Sarah says:

    This makes curd-making approachable! I’ve made a lemon curd a few times but still have been daunted by the whole recipe. Maybe I didn’t think the finished product should be strained? Anyway, thank you :)

  2. 2
    ColleenB.~Texas says:

    Thank U 4 the recipe.
    Have a wonderful and enjoyable weekend

  3. 3
    Mimi says:

    Beautiful! I like the freezer tip! Good to know.

  4. 4
    Amelia says:

    Marisa, I absolutely love Food in Jars! I’ve tried so many of your recipes. I’ve made lemon curd from your book, and always wondered if I did something wrong. Although it tastes delicious, the canned curd is too firm, looking nothing like the serving suggestion in the pictures. I’m going to try the blood orange curd. Can’t wait for to buy your next book!

  5. 5
    Kelly H. says:

    Marisa, you forgot my favourite way to have curd! Straight from the fridge with a spoon! :)

  6. 6
    e says:

    Marisa, this is another topic that I would love to see demonstrated when you are in Portland! I’ve been intimidated by the curd recipes but LOVE lemon curd. I might feel more confident if saw you make it. Just a thought for your next visit… (and a pressure canning demo!)

    Thanks!

  7. 7
    Eddie C. Jordan says:

    Blood orange curd is a must, as well as lemon curd. Blood orange curd makes a great orange pie, or a great smoothie.

  8. 8
    Zubayda M says:

    Marisa,

    I’m new to your site. Love what I’ve seen so far. Looking forward to trying some of your recipes.

  9. 9
    Trisha says:

    My first experience making curd was the meyer lemon curd from your book. The first time I didn’t it, and the second time I did and I have to agree that the texture went funny. Do you thinka mix of blood orange and meyer lemon juice would work?

    • 9.1
      Marisa says:

      Unless you’re making a curd that’s entirely lemon or lime juice, it’s not safe for canning. Don’t do it with a combination of blood orange and lemon juice.

  10. 10
    Deb says:

    After you inspired me with your Meyer Lemon post last winter, and I banished my ‘gray doldrums’ last February by preserving my way through a massive amount of Meyers (thank you very much), I found some blood oranges calling out to me. Blood orange surpassed my love of lemon! Both the marmalade and the curd made my mouth feel like it was full of heaven. ;>

    Thanks for the post and recipe. I hope someone else accepts the inspiration and has as wonderful an experience as I did. ;>

    I might have enough blood oranges left when I have the time to make your version of the curd, but if not, I have some berry juice in the freezer it would be fun to curd. (and berries are so local here in the pacific northwet!) ;>

    Thanks for the inspiration for the 2nd gray season!

  11. 11
    Kristina says:

    This is absolutely gorgeous. One thing I have never made is a curd. Off to look for some blood oranges.

    • 11.1
      Marisa says:

      Kristina, you should try it! And if you can’t find blood oranges, grapefruit also makes lovely curd.

  12. 12
    Tia Mia says:

    Hi there Marisa – I am totally off sugar. Do you think this would this work with honey, honey?

    • 12.1
      Marisa says:

      Hey Tia Mia,

      I’ve never tried it with honey, but I’ve actually been meaning to do just that. I still have a few blood oranges, so I will give it a shot tomorrow and report back my findings. My best guess is that it will work, but will require a bit less honey than sugar.

      Stay tuned!

  13. 13
    Cate says:

    You can freeze curd? Who knew. What is the texture like when you thaw it? (Most egg products don’t freeze well so forgive me for being a little dubious.)

  14. 14
    Monica says:

    Thanks for the recipe, can’t wait to try. I made your meyer lemon and lime agan this year, both excellent. I found a recipe on-line for blood orange curd. It looked and tasted blah.

  15. 15

    […] I posted the recipe for blood orange curd last week, my mom’s best friend Maria sent me a note asking whether if curds could be made […]

  16. 16

    […] would work as well. In addition, I froze a couple jars. I’ve been hesitant to do this, but several resources describe how it can work. It’s nice to have more than a week or two, so I’ll […]

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Honey Sweetened Meyer Lemon Curd | Food in Jars - March 5, 2014

    […] I posted the recipe for blood orange curd last week, my mom’s best friend Maria sent me a note asking whether if curds could be made […]

  2. Iwaruna.com » Lime curd with a hint of ginger - March 8, 2014

    […] would work as well. In addition, I froze a couple jars. I’ve been hesitant to do this, but several resources describe how it can work. It’s nice to have more than a week or two, so I’ll […]

Leave a Reply